Update 2: Yuneec, the manufacturers of the Typhoon H Pro, are the most awesome team to work with. They reviewed my flight logs and determined that something unusual had happened during my last flight causing the copter to drop out of the sky or fly off. I never saw what happened to it. The customer service department was very apologetic over the incident, which probably wasn't their fault at all. I requested a quote to purchase the parts that I had lost. I loved the device and wanted another one. With sincerity and professionalism, Yuneec had replaced my missing drone with a brand new one; no charge( not even shipping costs). They did not have to do that for I was willing to pay for the missing copter. Yuneec, you have the best customer service I've ever worked with or had ever heard of. I will always be a fan ... full review
The Bobop has a 14 megapixel camera with a 180 degree field-of-view fisheye lens, but since the camera lens has such a wide field-of-view and a really fast processor, it can take the full 14 megapixel image, fix the image distortion (eliminating the fisheye effect), stabilize the image, then send the live video back to your phone. What all that means is that you’ll be getting a digitally stabilized 720p video feed straight to your phone. At the same time, It also records digitally stabilized 1080p video to the 8GB of onboard memory.
This FPV drone focuses more on the actual drone than it does the camera aspects, however, considering you get more features and capabilities. You can use a FPV real time HD live transmission with your mobile device using the FPV WiFi feature, have Headless mode, a low voltage alarm, 360-degree flips, and gravity induction that allows you to fly at all angles and in every direction.
It shoots 1080p video and stabilizes it using a mechanical gimbal. This makes the Spark much better at shooting video than drones that only rely on digital stabilization. You can get exactly the kind of shot you’re looking for by connecting the Spark to your phone via Wi-Fi and using the virtual joysticks, but there’s an easier way of shooting that can make even a beginner look like a pro.
You get up to 9 minutes of flight time, have a 640x480p camera, and video capabilities that lack audio as there is no microphone. You can do flips in the air at the touch of a button on the transmitter, and there is a button that lets you share a video on social media instantly. The LED lights located at the center of each propeller and the headlight are pretty useful for flying at night, too.
Safety is always a key issue when buying a camera drone. Stable and worry-free flight requires an advanced flight controller, which handles commands intelligently. The more intelligent the processor, the greater the smoother your flight experience will be. Try to find a camera drone with an advanced obstacle avoidance system. Top drones even have features like auto return-to-home when the drone’s battery is running low.

The DJI Inspire 2 is aimed at professional cinematographers, news organizations, and independent filmmakers. And it's priced as such—its $3,000 MSRP doesn't include a camera. You have the option of adding a 1-inch sensor fixed-lens camera, a Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens model, or a Super35mm cinema mount with its own proprietary lens system and support for 6K video capture.


The Mavic Air is not a foldable Spark. This is a drone with all of the features that make it worthy of the Mavic name. Aside from the main camera, there are two front facing cameras, two rear facing cameras, and two downward facing cameras. All of these cameras are used for obstacle avoidance and advanced vision positioning. Just like the Mavic Pro, you also get dual IMUs, GPS and GLONASS for more accuracy. With all of this data to process, the Mavic Air has many different onboard chips that are designed for specific tasks like video encoding, machine learning, flight control, battery management and more.
Yes, the main feature of the Falcore is the video streaming quality, and that alone is a good enough reason to want this drone, but there’s some other features that make it great for beginners as well. The new SHIELD mode is something we’ve never seen in a racing drone before. It’s a flying mode that uses ultrasonic sensors to keep the Falcore at about 3 feet from the ground at all times. It also mixes the roll and yaw controls together, so you can fly with only one control stick ( left/right and forward/backward). This makes flying the Falcore more like driving an RC car!
I've bought about a dozen or more different micro drones over the last two years and would put this one at the top of the pack. I read the reviews and saw the problems with the charging port. As a result I've made an effort to be gentle with the charging port and have had no probles at all et. Altitude hold is a terrific feature for beginners just learning to fly these things. The auto take-off is another big plus. Very smooth acceleration was a surprise at first, after flying it for the first 5 min's I decided I liked the way it handled better than any micro drone I've owned. Slightly less flight time and a bit bigger mean it's not as 'zippy' as some like the Aukey but when flying indoor's that just translates to fewer impacts with walls and other objects. The prop guards ... full review

When the AR Drone 2.0 first came out, it was one of the coolest drones for sale on the market. It has a 1GHz 32 bit processor, 1GB of ram, gyros, accelerometers, magnetometers, a pressure sensor, an ultrasonic sensor, 2 cameras and more. Even though it’s over 2 years old, the AR Drone is still one of the most advanced quadcopters available in its price range which is $299.
It does include a camera, although not the greatest quality but still fun to play around with. This drone, like many others also has a headless feature, but also features an altitude hold function or hover which is something most of the less expensive drones do not have. This is especially useful when trying to learn how to hover. FPV is not possible with the small LCD display on the controller but it does give you some vital information about the drone during flight.
There are a few downsides to this drone, the main one being the price. At $1,999 USD, not everyone will be able to afford it. It also uses a 2 axis gimbal, so panning motion is not very smooth. Since it doesn’t have a controller, that also means you can’t fly the drone farther than wifi range will allow. The biggest issue with this drone in my opinion is the size It’s not much larger than the Mavic 2 when unfolded, but that’s the problem, it doesn’t fold up at all. This means if you want to fit it into a camera bag or small backpack, you’re just out of luck.
DJI's Mavic 2 Pro (9/10 WIRED Recommends) is in a class of its own—it's the best drone you can buy right now if price is no concern. The image and video quality are amazing, and the ability to travel—and track objects—at 45 miles per hour means you're not going to miss a shot. The omnidirectional obstacle-avoidance will keep the drone out of the trees, and the 25-minute flying time means you can stay aloft longer. It's expensive, but in this case, you get what you pay for.

The DJI Inspire 2 is aimed at professional cinematographers, news organizations, and independent filmmakers. And it's priced as such—its $3,000 MSRP doesn't include a camera. You have the option of adding a 1-inch sensor fixed-lens camera, a Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens model, or a Super35mm cinema mount with its own proprietary lens system and support for 6K video capture.


If you’ve heard of the Mavic Pro, you should already know that this is an amazing little drone. The design is great. The Mavic Air was made to be functional, but also look the part. With lines that resemble a high end sports car, there’s no other drone out there with a design this good, but looks aren’t what make this drone so great. At the end of the day, people want drones that are small, and the Mavic Air is beyond small; it’s tiny. It’s smaller than the Spark. Pictures don’t do justice. Some would even go as far as saying the Mavic Air is pocketable.
But that’s not all! You aren’t just paying for an electronic Lego mount. The mambo is much easier to fly than most toy drones. Thanks to the powerful onboard processor, the bottom facing camera and an ultrasonic sensor, it can hover in place and hold its position without needing to make any corrections. Speaking of sensors, although the Mambo doesn’t have a front facing camera, you can still see the video feed from the bottom facing camera on your smartphone.
If you or your kids want to learn programming for the first time, Tello is great for that too. You can learn to program visually using blocks, or the more traditional way using real languages like Apple’s Swift and Python. This means you can start from ground zero with no experience and learn to code, or utilize the Power of Python and thousands of existing libraries to do almost any task you can think of!
The next 2 versions of the Hubsan X4 have cameras. They’re slightly bigger and heavier than the cheaper version of the X4, but the flight time is about the same. The H107C is the version with a standard definition camera and the 61170-02 is the one with a 720p camera. The Hubsan X4 with the standard camera is ok, but the 720p camera takes much better video. The only problem with the HD version is that it’s more expensive and the flight time is slightly less.
Pairing the remote with the drone is quite simple and works well. Like many other toy drones it has a 360° ROLL-OVER feature so even if you’re not a stunt flyer, your friends will think you are. It has two bright LED lights, one red and one blue which makes seeing it at night much easier. This quad comes with a spare set of blades which makes it great for giving as a gift to a small child who has never flown one before.
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