The Parrot Bebop 2 Power is one of the more technologically advanced drones for sale right now. It doesn't have a lot of the features that the Spark has (palm control and gesture recognition), but it makes up for that with the extremely long flight time of 30 minutes. This means you can fly farther without worrying about needing to come back in just a few minutes.
It makes use of DJI’s new application DJI Fly, which comes with several enhancements. Users can access the SkyPixel, a social media platform for sharing aerial pictures and videos and discovering popular spots in their area. The camera is good and can take decent pictures even on cloudy days. It is equipped with a 360-degree propeller guard for protecting the propellers and improving safety. The GPS and downward vision sensors help it hover precisely, both indoors and outdoors. The remote controller maintains the feed for up to a distance of 4 km. The dimensions are 6.3 x 3.1 x 0.4 inches and it weighs 0.16 ounces.
But what really sets the AA108 apart is its wide range of extra features that make it prefect for users at any skill level. Beginners can take advantage of its headless and altitude hold modes to help with the steep learning curve that comes with flying your first quadcopter. Advanced users can set it at the higher speed setting to see what the aircraft can really do, taking advantage of the high-quality HD camera features and custom pathing to get great footage and pull off amazing stunts.
It does include a camera, although not the greatest quality but still fun to play around with. This drone, like many others also has a headless feature, but also features an altitude hold function or hover which is something most of the less expensive drones do not have. This is especially useful when trying to learn how to hover. FPV is not possible with the small LCD display on the controller but it does give you some vital information about the drone during flight.

The Falcore has a lot of cool technology inside of it, but this drone isn’t heavy on pro racing features. There is an OSD, but you can’t adjust any settings on the flight controller from the OSD like you can on the Vortex 180 and it runs Cleanflight which isn’t as good as Bataflight. Another thing that you might not think about is range. The video transmitter and receiver have a range of 1000 feet to 3000 feet depending on the environment you’re in. Although this is fine for most park flights, there are races that might require a more reliable signal at those farther distances, and with a traditional analog FPV setup it’s easy to get more range with better antennas.
The best camera drones in 2020 are equipped with a handful of smart flight features. These make capturing stunning footage in difficult situations much easier and fun. For example, for times when you are shooting fast-moving objects, a feature like ActiveTrack will direct the camera drone to recognize and track a subject while keeping it in the frame. There are a variety of other intelligent features available on camera drones, so do be sure to check those out before buying yours.
Aside from the video features, the Breeze has a lot of the same features that the Spark has. Follow-me, orbit, dronie and all of the other features work ok, but DJI has more flying options while still being easier to use. To be honest, the Breeze flies great. It uses a downward facing camera and IR sensor to keep it from drifting just like the Spark. It’s actually more stable than the GoPro Karma, but that isn’t saying much…

To launch the drone and set up your shots, you just use your smartphone, or your Apple Watch. There are a few ways that the R1 can follow you. These flight modes are called Cinematic Skills (Follow, Lead, Orbit, Side, Tripod). Using follow will make the R1 follow you from behind. Lead will make the drone predict your direction and stay in front of you. Side stays to the side for panning shots. Tripod keeps the drone in one spot while looking at you like an automated tripod in the sky.


Our expert reviewer and tester evaluate drones on a number of factors. For starters, we examine the size and design, taking into account my many rotors the drone has, how portable it is, and if it comes with an included remote control or camera. Next, take it out to a park or wilderness area and test how easy it is to learn and fly. We pay attention to the learning curve of learning the control, and how much latency there is in video transmission (if the controller has such a feature). We also look at flight capabilities like omnidirectaonal sensing, obstacle avoidance, tracking, and automatic landing. 

It is a good time to get yourself a camera drone in 2020. The best UAV companies are continuously trying to impress the market with unique and innovative camera drone models that not only have great features but are also reliable and intuitive. What’s more, prices of camera drones have come down. You can buy an entry-level camera drone for less than $400 USD. For above $1000 USD you can purchase a professional drone with professional image quality and performance.


You might not be able to spend so much on a drone like the Mavic Air 2, but its great collision-avoidance tech is why we made it our top pick. For a more affordable option, the Mavic Mini (8/10, WIRED Recommends) from DJI is also a great choice (and our previous favorite). It flies nearly as well as its larger siblings, though wind gusts that wouldn't faze the Mavic 2 Pro will ground the Mini. There's also no 4K video and no front and rear collision-avoidance sensors like you'll find in more expensive drones.
To launch the drone and set up your shots, you just use your smartphone, or your Apple Watch. There are a few ways that the R1 can follow you. These flight modes are called Cinematic Skills (Follow, Lead, Orbit, Side, Tripod). Using follow will make the R1 follow you from behind. Lead will make the drone predict your direction and stay in front of you. Side stays to the side for panning shots. Tripod keeps the drone in one spot while looking at you like an automated tripod in the sky.
This drone has a lot of really cool features. Although it’s only 90 mm in size, it has 7500KV brushless motors capable of running 2S or 3S batteries. That means this thing will fly like a mini bullet! To drive each motor, the Armor 90 has a 4 in 1 ESC capable of handling 10 amps of power per motor. It’s also Oneshot/Dshot300 compatible for super fast motor response times.
The Mavic Air takes most of the features DJI has implemented in their Pro drone line and just packs them into a much smaller package. It isn’t exactly mini-drone sized when it’s fully unfolded, but once folded up, DJI touts a size no taller or thicker than the average smartphone. Even the intuitive controller folds up to a smaller size, too, so clearly, DJI was building this drone with portability in mind.
Drones have many uses, but most people use them as flying cameras. You can capture amazing videos and photos thanks to the advances in camera quality and the invention of brushless camera gimbals. Drones are also used for many industrial applications such as: search and rescue missions, fire fighting, police operations, wildlife monitoring, crop surveying, crop dusting, structure inspections, 3D map generation, professional video production, controllable lighting, signal repeating, and communication.
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