The Phantom 4 Pro is an excellent choice for aerial photographers that seek professional results. It features a 1-inch CMOS sensor and shoots 4K 60fps video, making it great for filmmaking and photography. It also features DJI’s FlightAutonomy system, providing you with five directions of obstacle sensing. This can come in handy when flying in tight spaces, which is sometimes required for filming and photography. If this feature isn’t hugely important to you, you can save some money and get a Phantom 4 Advanced, which comes with two directions of obstacle sensing. While this drone model is no longer in production, you can pick up a refurbished one! 
Flight speed on some models can reach 35 mph. You should use limited flight mode as a beginner to prevent crashes until you become more comfortable flying the drone at faster speeds. A fast maximum flight speed is a good feature to look for if you want to explore with the drone. It helps make up for the low battery life. Flight speed won't matter much if you use the drone for inspections and recording memories.
These drones for sale are great for all levels of drone expertise because of the Absolute Control mode to change the experience level and is instantly stabilized from its design once in the air. You can even unlock community achievements through your altitude, speeds, and time records. The battery life is a whopping 12 minutes, which is great considering it’s still considered a toy drone.
The biggest competitor for the Bebop 2 is the DJI Spark. Although you can’t use hand gestures to control the Bebop 2 and there’s no obstacle avoidance, you do get features like follow me and visual subject tracking. For $599, it also comes with the controller, two batteries, and goggles that work with most smartphones. If you really want to shoot good videos, the Spark might be a better option because of the 2 axis gimbal, but the digital stabilization of the Bebop 2 is almost just as good.
There’s only one thing that the Parrot Mambo has that you won’t find on the Tello. Legos. Although DJI shows Lego blocks in their advertising photos, the Tello is not Lego block compatible like the Mambo is. For adults, this isn’t something you should care about, but if you’re buying the Tello for a kid who likes Lego, you might want to consider the Mambo instead.
But that’s not all! You aren’t just paying for an electronic Lego mount. The mambo is much easier to fly than most toy drones. Thanks to the powerful onboard processor, the bottom facing camera and an ultrasonic sensor, it can hover in place and hold its position without needing to make any corrections. Speaking of sensors, although the Mambo doesn’t have a front facing camera, you can still see the video feed from the bottom facing camera on your smartphone.
As the name implies, the Breeze shoots 4K video, and honestly it looks really good! The only down side is that there's no gimbal, so you don’t get image stabilization, so everything will be shaky looking unless you use special editing software to stabilize the video. There is a 1080p mode with stabilization, but I found that it doesn’t work all that well. For smooth shots, the DJI Spark wins, but the ability to shoot in 4K does allow the Breeze to get some decent shots if you know how to stabilize them.
The TBS Vendetta is a quadcopter designed specifically for FPV (first person view) racing and freestyle flying. Today, you can find quite a few mini FPV racing drones that come ready to fly, but the Vendetta was one of the first racing drones to come out with everything you need to fly. It comes with almost everything you need to start learning to race. The only things that it won’t come with is a controller, battery, charger and FPV video goggles, but in the world of drone racing you’ll usually want to choose that stuff to fit your needs anyway.
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