Just like all of the drones from ImmersionRC, the Vortex 180 is an extremely well-built ready-to-fly racing drone with all of the features that beginners and pros need. The first thing you’ll notice from the older Vortex quadcopters is the cleaner design. All of the electronics are sandwiched between the carbon fiber on the top and the printed circuit board on the bottom. The only thing that sticks out is the camera which is protected by a hard plastic case.
It comes with an all-in-one android controller, which means you don’t need a smartphone to use it, but the user interface is nowhere near as simple as the Phantom 4 or any DJI product for that matter. That’s one of the main reasons why we prefer DJI’s drones over what Yuneec offers. Also, you will need to upgrade to the Typhoon H Pro “with Realsense” to get full obstacle avoidance functionality.

Propel's X-Wing fighter drone is a great drone for Star Wars fans. There are actually three drones in this line: the X-Wing, a Tie X1, and a Speeder Bike. The best part is all of them have a "battle mode" so you can fly against friends and try to shoot them down. Get hit three times with the IR beam and your drone will auto-land. Unfortunately, these have a learning curve when it comes to flying—a little tap of the control stick goes a long way—and mine had a habit of flying off at an angle immediately on takeoff. Holding a position is also a lost cause, but once you master the sensitive controls, these are fun to fly (and fight).


And now the bad news. You get what you pay for, and if you want an aerial video platform that can capture stunning footage, you need to be ready to spend some cash. Because drones are such pricey propositions, it pays to do your research before buying one. We've tested many of the ready-to-fly models on the market to determine what's important to look for, and the best models available.
This is one of the most unique drones I’ve seen in a while. Instead of having a quadcopter design like all the other drones, the Parrot Disco is a flying wing. Unlike other flying wings, the Disco is very easy to fly thanks to Parrots flight controller which uses all of the same sensors found on a typical camera drone. since the Disco is technically a plane, it can’t stop while flying and it can’t take off vertically either. To launch it, you throw it forward and it automatically flies itself until you take over the controls.
The last feature only available on the Mavic 2 Pro is HDR video. Unlike the Parrot Anafi, this HDR shooting mode is for capturing true HDR content and outputting to a HDR enabled TV or monitor. This means you won’t see the HDR effect unless you have an HDR TV that supports HLG color. You do have the right TV for viewing the footage, this is a really cool shooting mode for creating true HDR content.

The modular design of this unique-looking racing drone for sale makes it easy to upgrade if you so choose, and the parts are high-quality and quite durable. It has a decent range and flight time and three flight modes that make it easy for beginners or more experienced pilots to use. This is not the most advanced racing drone out there, but if you’re just getting started in this exciting field this drone is a good place to begin.


If image quality is your priority, then you might opt for the Mavic 2 Pro over the Zoom. The 2 Pro is equipped with a 1” CMOS, 20-megapixel camera co-engineered in partnership with Hasselblad, the world’s leading manufacturer of medium format cameras and lenses. The Zoom’s camera system is still professional-grade however, with a 1/2.3” CMOS, 12-megapixel sensor.
If you’re familiar with the Parrot Mambo, the DJI Tello is very similar but even better. It has a slightly longer fight time (13 minutes in ideal conditions), better build quality, and two cameras. Just like the Mambo, the Tello has a camera on the bottom that is used for keeping the drone from drifting. This means you won’t have to fight the drone to get it hovering for the first time. It will simply takeoff and hover effortlessly. Thanks to the intel processor, there is also a second camera that faces forward for FPV flying and streaming live video back to your smartphone.
The biggest drawback of the Vortex 285 is the frame design. It’s about 35mm larger than the Vortex 250 Pro (which isn’t a problem for traveling thanks to the folding arm design), but the frame has a lot of small plastic pieces holding it together. In other words, the Vortex 250 Pro and Vortex 180 will be a lot stronger than the 285 because they have a stronger and more simple frame design.
EDITED to 4 stars from 1 star. The copter had flown great initially until it didn't. So I returned the unit for refund. Then after a couple of weeks I got an unexpected email from Holy Stone asking me if they could send me a new one. I said no, I'm just asking for a refund. I was then told, no, you don't understand, you already got your refund. We just want to replace your copter for you anyway. That's outstanding service. More than I deserve but extremely impressive. They obviously place their customers and reputation above all else. Given the high marks this copter receives from others ... full review
The video stabilization is not like what you'll find on the Yuneec breeze or the Passport Drone. Although the Bebop doesn't have a gimbal, it does a very good job of simulating one. Using the 180 degree lens and an onboard image processor, it will crop out the full image and record in a 1080p window of the image sensor. By doing this, the video is extremely stable. You can even make the camera look up and down or left and right without moving the drone.
There are a lot of things I haven’t mentioned, like the quick release arms that come off for easy transportation, or the included battery charger, but overall I think the Falcore is a great drone for beginners and it’s amazing that they were able to put such an expensive video transmission system in an affordable ready-to-fly racing drone. With the tilted motor design, I wouldn’t recommend the Falcore for freestyle stunt flying (get a Vortex 180 or build your own drone for freestyle), but as a racing drone for intermediate pilots and especially beginners, this quad is a great option.
There are a lot of poor quality drone kits for sale out there, so we handpicked only the best do-it-yourself drone kits on the market. We took into consideration Amazon reviews (4 stars+ only!), customer satisfaction, manufacture quality, and our own unique experiences to choose only the best done kits. This ensures we give our readers only the best in DIY drone kits.
The Falcore streams 720p 60fps video directly to the controller which is already impressive (other racing drones stream analog standard definition video), but what’s more important is the 27mS latency. This is what makes the Connex system different from other digital transmission technologies. On a camera drone like the Phantom 4, the video latency is over 100mS. That’s fine for doing aerial photography, but for drone racing 27mS is the standard and having any more latency than that makes it hard to fly fast.
This drone really stands out style-wise from other good cheap drones. It has striking green streaks on top that give it the look and feel of an alien insect. This drone also comes with a controller, which can sometimes be rare in affordable drones. It is made of strong ABS material. ABS material is light, flexible, bendable, and soft. This makes it a really durable drone which is perfect for beginners and crash-prone pilots. It comes with real-time transmission via its wifi network. This allows it to connect directly to your phone so you can view everything your drones camera sees in real time. It has a headless mode which allows it to be operated easily regardless of which direction it is facing. It also has gravity induction which allows you to fly your drone forward, backward, left, and right in correspondence to the angle at which you hold your mobile device.

The Mavic Air takes most of the features DJI has implemented in their Pro drone line and just packs them into a much smaller package. It isn’t exactly mini-drone sized when it’s fully unfolded, but once folded up, DJI touts a size no taller or thicker than the average smartphone. Even the intuitive controller folds up to a smaller size, too, so clearly, DJI was building this drone with portability in mind.
Unfortunately, a good drone is going to cost you good money. Drones with cameras have a lot of expensive technology inside of them which drives the manufacturing cost up. The Phantom 4 Pro is a drone with 7 individual cameras, two IR sensors, two compasses, two gyros, two accelerometers, Barometric Pressure Sensor, GPS/GLONASS receiver, 2.4Ghz and 5.8Ghz two way transceivers. Every component has some kind of computer attached to it. The motor controllers, power distribution board, flight controller, and even the battery have built in micro controllers that run low level tasks, like controlling the speed of a motor, or monitoring battery voltage.

Our expert reviewer and tester evaluate drones on a number of factors. For starters, we examine the size and design, taking into account my many rotors the drone has, how portable it is, and if it comes with an included remote control or camera. Next, take it out to a park or wilderness area and test how easy it is to learn and fly. We pay attention to the learning curve of learning the control, and how much latency there is in video transmission (if the controller has such a feature). We also look at flight capabilities like omnidirectaonal sensing, obstacle avoidance, tracking, and automatic landing.


The Parrot Bebop 2 Power is one of the more technologically advanced drones for sale right now. It doesn't have a lot of the features that the Spark has (palm control and gesture recognition), but it makes up for that with the extremely long flight time of 30 minutes. This means you can fly farther without worrying about needing to come back in just a few minutes.
The DJI Mavic Air offers a 32MP sensor, 4K video capability up to 30 fps, and fully panoramic image functions. There’s a 3-axis gimbal for stability when filming in flight, and there’s some pretty detailed environment sensing to help the drone get its bearings while flying. The model delivers up to 21 minutes of flight time, which is on par with much of the mid-to-pro-level drone market. There’s 8GB of onboard storage, HDR capabilities, and more.
If you're flying within the United States, you need to take heed of FAA guidelines—or be prepared to face potential fines or jail time. There are no-fly zones set by the FAA, so don't take off if you're near an airport without notifying the control tower first. And, even if you're out in the middle of nowhere, don't take your drone above 400 feet. Most are set to obey these regulations out of the box, but controlling a quadcopter is just like driving a car—even if you missed seeing that speed limit sign, you're still liable to pay the ticket.
The Bobop has a 14 megapixel camera with a 180 degree field-of-view fisheye lens, but since the camera lens has such a wide field-of-view and a really fast processor, it can take the full 14 megapixel image, fix the image distortion (eliminating the fisheye effect), stabilize the image, then send the live video back to your phone. What all that means is that you’ll be getting a digitally stabilized 720p video feed straight to your phone. At the same time, It also records digitally stabilized 1080p video to the 8GB of onboard memory.
Once you have a GoPro hooked up and are ready to go, you can use the TTR Hero application to monitor your distance, altitude, battery level, and more. Follow Me, Landing, Return to Home, and Waypoint Groundstation are the included features. Interestingly enough, Waypoint Groundstation allows support for up to 16 Waypoints that are preset by you before flying, which is pretty neat.
UPDATE: We called and emailed Holystone and they have delivered! Their customer service is outstanding! This is one of the reasons why after shopping for different quadcopter brands by reading the product reviews, the customer service factor was a huge consideration for me. So, we got the replacement 3-4 days after we called and emailed them about a problem on the trimmer with the first quadcopter sent. It definitely worked and performed way better. It took awhile before we figured out how to make it fly and try different things with it. So for those who almost or about to give up on their quadcopter, please call their customer service and they will be very happy to help you. I'm glad we did. It pays to be nice too.
When the AR Drone fist came out, it packed a lot of features that were never seen before on a drone, but now it's more of a toy compared to all of the camera drones you can find. As a toy drone, it's still impressive, but with a price higher than any other toy drone, it isn't for everyone. If you want a nice toy drone with some cool features and lower price tag, I would look at the Mambo or Mambo FPV.
This is truly a fantastic headset for gaming. I'm really happy with the audio and mic quality and the build is very comfortable for long sessions. Beyond a mute button for the mic, there is no control panel for the device to control the volume and other settings; all that has to be done through your pc/console. Things to note for PS4 specifically are the lack of surround sound functionality when using this headset with the system and also the headset by default uses microphone monitoring. This feature provides real time feedback of your own voice and other sounds in the mics radius to let the user gauge their own voice volume, this is a helpful way to counter your inability to hear your natural voice due to noise cancelation. If this is a feature you don't like than know that the PS4 can't turn it off for this specific ... full review
×