You can read our full review here for more detail, but here’s the gist of things: the Altair Aerial AA108 is the best drone for anyone who’s just getting started, and an excellent choice for more experienced fliers as well. It’s incredibly durable – something that’s very important for anyone who’s just getting started and is likely to crash often. It also has a very good range (100m) and flight time (8-10 minutes) considering that it costs less than $200.

The DJI Phantom series drones are some of the most capable and recognizable drones on the market. The Phantom 1 was a revolutionary aircraft that put DJI and prosumer drones on the map. The Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 has collectively built on the series success and continues to be used for photography, filmmaking, inspections, and various other applications.
The Anafi is a great drone for the price, but the biggest complaint I have by far is the lack of any sensors for obstacle avoidance. The only obstacle that this drone will stop you from hitting is the ground, that is, as long as you don’t hit a tree first. All of the other drones in this price range have some kind of obstacle avoidance, so why they couldn’t even add some IR sensors is beyond me.
The last feature only available on the Mavic 2 Pro is HDR video. Unlike the Parrot Anafi, this HDR shooting mode is for capturing true HDR content and outputting to a HDR enabled TV or monitor. This means you won’t see the HDR effect unless you have an HDR TV that supports HLG color. You do have the right TV for viewing the footage, this is a really cool shooting mode for creating true HDR content.
I've been buying and flying quadcopters for two years now. Everything from Hubsan X4s to Cheerson CX 20s (Quanum Nova). The Phantom 3 Professional is simply amazing. Unboxing and set-up was pretty easy. Set up consists of charging the batteries, updating the firmware, installing the props, and calibrating the compass (also the IMU but that's a one time thing). Even if this is your first quadcopter and you don't understand everything I'm writing about, you can set this up and fly it, trust me, and its a blast! Once I got in the air, ... full review
Our expert reviewer and tester evaluate drones on a number of factors. For starters, we examine the size and design, taking into account my many rotors the drone has, how portable it is, and if it comes with an included remote control or camera. Next, take it out to a park or wilderness area and test how easy it is to learn and fly. We pay attention to the learning curve of learning the control, and how much latency there is in video transmission (if the controller has such a feature). We also look at flight capabilities like omnidirectaonal sensing, obstacle avoidance, tracking, and automatic landing.
×