Our expert reviewer and tester evaluate drones on a number of factors. For starters, we examine the size and design, taking into account my many rotors the drone has, how portable it is, and if it comes with an included remote control or camera. Next, take it out to a park or wilderness area and test how easy it is to learn and fly. We pay attention to the learning curve of learning the control, and how much latency there is in video transmission (if the controller has such a feature). We also look at flight capabilities like omnidirectaonal sensing, obstacle avoidance, tracking, and automatic landing.
Portability is the new trend of the camera drone market. Most of the time, it is inconvenient and tough to carry a large, heavy camera drone around. This is particularly the case for those of you who want to shoot when traveling. By that rationale, mini drones make it infinitely easier for you to shoot on the go, no matter if hiking or attending a family barbecue.
But what really sets the AA108 apart is its wide range of extra features that make it prefect for users at any skill level. Beginners can take advantage of its headless and altitude hold modes to help with the steep learning curve that comes with flying your first quadcopter. Advanced users can set it at the higher speed setting to see what the aircraft can really do, taking advantage of the high-quality HD camera features and custom pathing to get great footage and pull off amazing stunts.
The Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 also comes with an option to purchase the remote controller with an in-built screen. The ultra-bright 5.5-inch screen is easily visible in direct sunlight. The DJI Go 4 app is in-built into the screen, so you don't need a smartphone to operate the aircraft. The remote control has up to five hours of battery life, which gives you a comprehensive camera drone suitable for advanced aerial photography
The EVO has obstacle avoidance sensors on the front and in the back. In the font, you get two obstacle avoidance cameras (same as the Mavic). On the back, you’ll find not cameras, but a IR sensor for obstacle avoidance. IR sensors or good for close obstacle detection, but they don’t work for seeing obstacles that are more complex or far away. The Mavic Air and Mavic 2 use cameras on the rear, so they will naturally do better at avoiding obstacles at higher speeds. In any case, if you need obstacle avoidance on your drone, the EVO has it.
It is simple to fly, easy to set up and comes with a stabilized drone camera capable of shooting 4K footage. The image sensors are excellent and offer superior footage along with sensors for ground scanning for indoor flying. The camera is crystal clear and offers real-time HD quality videos with intuitive flight controls for capturing professional quality images.
The Mavic Pro 2 also has some serious appeal for pilots who make a living from aerial video and imaging. Its camera sports a 1-inch class sensor for higher quality photos, and it can record 4K footage with a wide or standard angle of view. It's a lot smaller than the Inspire too, appealing for independent creatives working without the support of a full film crew.
I've been flying drones for seven years now, and I still get a little nervous every time I fly. If you've invested more than $1,000 in your drone, you'd be crazy not to be a little nervous. One of the best ways to get over that is to practice with a cheap one—like my favorite toy drone from Symatoys. The X20 is sold in a variety of configurations and rebranded by several companies, but it's all the same basic hardware. Don't pay more than $40. Be careful flying indoors, as it can hurt when it hits you (ask me how I know that). It's a little different to fly compared to the bigger drones (if anything it's more difficult), but also a lot of fun.
A lot of people also asked about the charger and whether or not they would need to buy one, but the drone comes with a USB charger that connects the drone to the remote. One user even commented saying that they were using a phone charger cord, which is a great replacement if the original cord breaks. You will need 6 AA batteries for the remote itself, so make sure you stock up!
If you want to take drone activity to new heights (literally), the DJI Mavic 2 Pro makes a pretty great splurge. This drone is an evolution of its predecessor, capable of staying airborne for 31 minutes and hitting speeds of 44 miles per hour during flight — faster the previous generation. But we think drone aficionados will find their true joy in the new DJI software. Features like ActiveTrack 2.0 assist the drone with following moving subjects autonomously. Seeing real-time video is better than ever in 1080p with the addition of OcuSync 2.0, and eight gigabytes of storage (with SD card capacity up to 128GB) allow for plenty of HD footage or images from the 20MP camera. 

It is a bare-bones quadcopter that relies entirely on the skills of the pilot handling the remote. Controls are easy to use. It comes in a minimalistic design with a plastic frame and electronics placed in a small cavity at the center. It has a small battery-powered at 500 mAh. The camera is small and is connected by wires. It also has a micro-USB card for storing videos and images. The rotors are small at 5.25 cm diameter and made of plastic with a small screw locking it in place. You also get a spare set of rotors along with a small screwdriver. Buttons on the quadcopter can take photos, start and stop videos, flip and change the flight mode, etc.
The flight time and speed on the Mavic 2 is unmatched by anything but the Phantom 4 Pro. It’s super fast in sport mode, and surprisingly faster than the old Mavic Pro even in the normal flight mode with obstacle avoidance enabled. With all that speed combined with a 30 minute flight time, you can go super far distances without worrying about if you’ll make it back to home base. The video feed is also improved over the old mavic. With Ocusync 2.0 you get a full 1080p video feed with little to no interference even in urban environments.

With a reasonable flight time of 30 minutes and a range of 11 miles, you’ve got a lot to work with in terms of setting up your shot and creating sweeping artistic videography. While larger than some of the other drones reviewed here, it’s able to fold and should fit in a large backpack. It’s easy to control and fly, with accurate obstacle detection and top speeds of 45 mph.
The Nano doesn’t have the auto flipping functions that the Alias does, but that isn’t a problem since you can do flips manually and it’s more fun. Since the Nano QX is smaller than the Alias, it’s much cheaper. The only annoying thing about having a smaller quadcopter like the Nano QX is that it’s harder to see when flying far away, so it’s easier to lose orientation, but in general, it’s still a good quadcopter to learn with, especially since you can also use it with any DSMX RC transmitter.
Aside from the video features, the Breeze has a lot of the same features that the Spark has. Follow-me, orbit, dronie and all of the other features work ok, but DJI has more flying options while still being easier to use. To be honest, the Breeze flies great. It uses a downward facing camera and IR sensor to keep it from drifting just like the Spark. It’s actually more stable than the GoPro Karma, but that isn’t saying much…
Drone and gimbal technology has spread across a diverse range of businesses and professional enterprise. Creative agencies, construction firms, and the public safety sectors are just an example of some industries that have embraced drone and gimbal technology. To help support enterprises of every type, DJI offers the Corporate Purchase Program, providing cost-effective solutions for organizations. This program is currently available in the USA, Canada, Mainland China and the EU (excluding the UK). Click here to apply.
The DJI Phantom series drones are some of the most capable and recognizable drones on the market. The Phantom 1 was a revolutionary aircraft that put DJI and prosumer drones on the map. The Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 has collectively built on the series success and continues to be used for photography, filmmaking, inspections, and various other applications.
If a drone doesn’t come with a gimbal and that’s the one you want the most, do some basic research to see whether or not you can purchase a separate gimbal and mount it. Aerial photography is much more difficult without a gimbal. It will ruin your chances of coming out with decent footage, so always opt for a drone with a gimbal or one you can purchase one for separately. 

Flying the Disco isn’t like flying other RC airplanes. If you want to go up, just push the stick up and it automatically adjusts the motor speed and wing pitch to go up at a steady controllable pace. If you want to go left or right, just push in a direction and it will go there. The Disco won’t flip or roll out of control like a standard plane. Even if you lose signal, the Disco will fly back to you just like a DJI drone would.
There isn’t much that the Inspire 2 CAN’T do. It comes standard with all of the features of the Phantom 4 Professional, but with a design optimized for performance and industry leading video features. It’s almost twice as big and twice as fast as the Phantom 4 (reaching speeds of almost 60MPH), and with it’s transforming design, the propellers will hardly ever appear in your videos. Additionally, the Inspire 2 comes with a dedicated FPV (first-person-view) camera so you can see where your flying at all times. With all of these features, you no longer have to blindly fly backward or sideways to get the shots you want.
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