The Typhoon H is the biggest competitor to the Phantom 4 we’ve seen so far. It’s a 6 rotor retractable landing gear beast of a drone, with a 360 degree gimbal (similar to the Inspire 1). What makes it similar to the Phantom 4? Well both drones get over 20 minutes of flight time, have obstacle avoidance, decent video quality and are in the same price range.


If you’ve seen the Mavic 2 Zoom and Mavic 2 Pro, you know they shoot 4K video at 30FPS. The EVO Goes one step further shooting 4K video at 60FPS. This is a great feature if you like capturing sports and action shots and slowing down the action. If it seems strange that a small company could come out with a drone that has a faster camera than DJI, that’s because it is. Personally, I think that DJI limited the framerate on the Mavic 2 so it didn’t fully cannibalize the Phantom 4 Pro, but nobody knows for sure.
Yes, the main feature of the Falcore is the video streaming quality, and that alone is a good enough reason to want this drone, but there’s some other features that make it great for beginners as well. The new SHIELD mode is something we’ve never seen in a racing drone before. It’s a flying mode that uses ultrasonic sensors to keep the Falcore at about 3 feet from the ground at all times. It also mixes the roll and yaw controls together, so you can fly with only one control stick ( left/right and forward/backward). This makes flying the Falcore more like driving an RC car!
This FPV drone focuses more on the actual drone than it does the camera aspects, however, considering you get more features and capabilities. You can use a FPV real time HD live transmission with your mobile device using the FPV WiFi feature, have Headless mode, a low voltage alarm, 360-degree flips, and gravity induction that allows you to fly at all angles and in every direction.
A lot of people also asked about the charger and whether or not they would need to buy one, but the drone comes with a USB charger that connects the drone to the remote. One user even commented saying that they were using a phone charger cord, which is a great replacement if the original cord breaks. You will need 6 AA batteries for the remote itself, so make sure you stock up!
Featuring a 1/2.3” CMOS sensor, the Skydio 2 records stunning 4K HDR footage at 60 fps and captures 12-megapixel stills. With autonomous speeds up to 36 mph, it captures dynamic cinematic shots with ease. Fly from the app, hand-held Beacon remote, or with a controller for even more precision. Its portable design makes it a compelling option for travel bloggers, documentary compilers, and commercial drone pilots in any industry.
If you’re looking for a fly camera to capture jaw-dropping aerial footage and photos, or just want to chronicle your adventures in a way you can be proud to show on the big screen, you likely want a 4K drone. 4K provides spectacular, 8-million-pixel quality resolution, which contributes a whopping four times more nuance and detail than you get from 1080p Full HD. With 4K, there is usually less noise — grainy or uneven spots. It’s also outstanding at rendering highlights and shadows, and it delivers superior results in low light. On the other hand, a drone with HD camera provides media that is easier to edit, still looks remarkable when viewed on a mobile or 1080p screen, and is generally easier to download to social media sites. With an HD camera drone, 4K camera drone or other drone camera, you can add a professional-quality edge to your projects by using drone lens filters to fine-tune your results and video editing software to incorporate specialty effects, multi-camera editing, image stabilization and more to fulfill your creative vision.
To be sure, you don’t want to lose any of the fruits of your drone’s flight recordings, so it might be a good idea to have microSD cards with you for plenty of storage. You can choose an app-controlled drone if you’re interested in having access to advanced in-flight features and aren’t concerned with the shorter range that goes along with using Bluetooth or Wi-Fi. Regardless of which drone you select, you’ll want to consider getting a drone case to protect it against moisture, dust and impact damage.

The Mavic Air is not a foldable Spark. This is a drone with all of the features that make it worthy of the Mavic name. Aside from the main camera, there are two front facing cameras, two rear facing cameras, and two downward facing cameras. All of these cameras are used for obstacle avoidance and advanced vision positioning. Just like the Mavic Pro, you also get dual IMUs, GPS and GLONASS for more accuracy. With all of this data to process, the Mavic Air has many different onboard chips that are designed for specific tasks like video encoding, machine learning, flight control, battery management and more.


For the power system, it has Lumenier RX2206-11 2350Kv motors and Lumenier 30A BLHeli_S ESCs with DSHOT Multishot and all of the other high-speed communication protocols you need. The flight controller is a MPU6000, STM32F405 (what a mouth full!). Basically, it’s a clone of a flight controller called the REVO that originally cost over $100 to make and had a super fast F4 processor. The FPV system is nothing that will blow you away like on the Falcore drone. It’s just your standard 200mW 5.8GHz Raceband TX and 600TVL camera, but it gets the job done for pro pilots, so I guess we can’t complain!
The Falcore has a lot of cool technology inside of it, but this drone isn’t heavy on pro racing features. There is an OSD, but you can’t adjust any settings on the flight controller from the OSD like you can on the Vortex 180 and it runs Cleanflight which isn’t as good as Bataflight. Another thing that you might not think about is range. The video transmitter and receiver have a range of 1000 feet to 3000 feet depending on the environment you’re in. Although this is fine for most park flights, there are races that might require a more reliable signal at those farther distances, and with a traditional analog FPV setup it’s easy to get more range with better antennas.
It shoots 1080p video and stabilizes it using a mechanical gimbal. This makes the Spark much better at shooting video than drones that only rely on digital stabilization. You can get exactly the kind of shot you’re looking for by connecting the Spark to your phone via Wi-Fi and using the virtual joysticks, but there’s an easier way of shooting that can make even a beginner look like a pro.
Even if you have no good reason to justify buying one, you have to admit that drones are cool. Some are glorified tech toys, but most models we highlight here are fit for use in imaging and cinematic applications small and large. If you think you can use a flying camera in your next project, there's some good news—the tech has come a long way in a very short time. There are models on the market now that put earlier copters to shame in terms of video quality and stabilization.

All Phantom 3 Series drones are currently available as refurbished models, which all come with full product warranties. The Phantom 3 Standard offers a stabilized 3-axis gimbal and up to 2.7K video shooting. It also features Lightbridge digital streaming, which allows live viewing at up to of 720p. The refurbished version is available for just $399, which is a great, affordable drone for hobbyists.


If you’re looking for the perfect drone to take your creativity to the next level, or if you work in videography, look no further than the DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2.0. The advanced camera features, including 20 megapixels, 4K video, and an accurate mechanical shutter put it on par with many traditional cameras. It delivers stunning video and images that any photographer would be proud of.
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