The battery lasts for about 23 minutes on a single charge, has a range of 3.2 miles, and has some pretty cool features. For example, there is a lock on the motor starting if you are 15 miles, or inside that radius, of the United State’s White House. No other drone we’ve seen has this type of feature. The controller is 2.4GHz and looks like a console controller with a clip for your smart device to sync with the app.

Our expert reviewer and tester evaluate drones on a number of factors. For starters, we examine the size and design, taking into account my many rotors the drone has, how portable it is, and if it comes with an included remote control or camera. Next, take it out to a park or wilderness area and test how easy it is to learn and fly. We pay attention to the learning curve of learning the control, and how much latency there is in video transmission (if the controller has such a feature). We also look at flight capabilities like omnidirectaonal sensing, obstacle avoidance, tracking, and automatic landing.

Software upgrades have improved the steering and navigation, adding omnidirectional sense and avoidance via 10 sensors across the drone’s body. It also has 3D mapping features to help it avoid crashes. That, plus the promise of five years of software support, ensures a long-lasting product that’s worth the investment. Our reviewer Jonno loved the Mavic 2 Pro's amazing photo and video quality, and the easy to pick up and learn controls.
The DJI Inspire 2 is aimed at professional cinematographers, news organizations, and independent filmmakers. And it's priced as such—its $3,000 MSRP doesn't include a camera. You have the option of adding a 1-inch sensor fixed-lens camera, a Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens model, or a Super35mm cinema mount with its own proprietary lens system and support for 6K video capture.
Though you’ll occasionally find good drones for less than $100, most drones for sale tend to be fairly expensive. It all depends on the brand and model that you are buying, as well as the features, specifications, etc that are involved. For example, for a more high-tech, newer drone that incorporates more than ten features, you’re going to be looking at a price that’s closer to $1000 more often than not.

Can you believe a drone this small actually has an HD camera? Well, it does! Even though it’s 2MP it still gets some decent shots paired with the 4GB Micro SD card, which is included with the drone itself. There are even a few features, such as the Headless Flight System, which orients the flight capability on the actual controller, so it’s easier to get the hang of. That feature alone is great for kids.
But that’s not all! You aren’t just paying for an electronic Lego mount. The mambo is much easier to fly than most toy drones. Thanks to the powerful onboard processor, the bottom facing camera and an ultrasonic sensor, it can hover in place and hold its position without needing to make any corrections. Speaking of sensors, although the Mambo doesn’t have a front facing camera, you can still see the video feed from the bottom facing camera on your smartphone.
The EVO from Autel Robotics is clearly copying the DJI Mavic series, but surprisingly this is more than just a subpar clone. Clearly the styling a little different from the Mavic 2 or Mavic Air. Just like the last drone Autel Robotics made (the X-Star Premium) the design of this thing looks very strange in my opinion. It comes in this bright orange color which is great for visibility, but some might argue it looks like a cheesy toy. Other than the color, the general design is pretty good. It folds into a small shape and has a full 3 axis gimbal just like the Mavic.

If a drone doesn’t come with a gimbal and that’s the one you want the most, do some basic research to see whether or not you can purchase a separate gimbal and mount it. Aerial photography is much more difficult without a gimbal. It will ruin your chances of coming out with decent footage, so always opt for a drone with a gimbal or one you can purchase one for separately.

Portability is the new trend of the camera drone market. Most of the time, it is inconvenient and tough to carry a large, heavy camera drone around. This is particularly the case for those of you who want to shoot when traveling. By that rationale, mini drones make it infinitely easier for you to shoot on the go, no matter if hiking or attending a family barbecue.
The Mambo FPV is a cool drone. It comes with everything you need (other than a smartphone) to start doing FPV. Although Parrot advertises the Mambo as an FPV racing drone, it’s not a real FPV racing drone like the ones in our FPV Racing section. It’s more of a cool FPV toy made for beginners and kids. In any case, I’m sure it will be a lot of fun around the holidays!

Drone and gimbal technology has spread across a diverse range of businesses and professional enterprise. Creative agencies, construction firms, and the public safety sectors are just an example of some industries that have embraced drone and gimbal technology. To help support enterprises of every type, DJI offers the Corporate Purchase Program, providing cost-effective solutions for organizations. This program is currently available in the USA, Canada, Mainland China and the EU (excluding the UK). Click here to apply.
Can you believe a drone this small actually has an HD camera? Well, it does! Even though it’s 2MP it still gets some decent shots paired with the 4GB Micro SD card, which is included with the drone itself. There are even a few features, such as the Headless Flight System, which orients the flight capability on the actual controller, so it’s easier to get the hang of. That feature alone is great for kids.
The Phantom 4 Pro is an excellent choice for aerial photographers that seek professional results. It features a 1-inch CMOS sensor and shoots 4K 60fps video, making it great for filmmaking and photography. It also features DJI’s FlightAutonomy system, providing you with five directions of obstacle sensing. This can come in handy when flying in tight spaces, which is sometimes required for filming and photography. If this feature isn’t hugely important to you, you can save some money and get a Phantom 4 Advanced, which comes with two directions of obstacle sensing. While this drone model is no longer in production, you can pick up a refurbished one! 

Your purchase choices may be driven by politics, but we look more closely at product performance and value. The price of DJI drones recently increased across the board for US customers, a response to increases in import tariffs. As result, competing drones from Autel, Parrot, and Yuneec are more compelling alternatives, as their prices have not yet ticked upward.


First of all, there’s no obstacle avoidance like you would see on DJI’s new drones, so if you lose connection with the drone, it won’t intelligently come back while avoiding obstacles. The other big drawback is that it’s a big drone that uses a lot of power, so the flight time is only about 16 minutes, and it goes down even more if you put a heavy camera on in like the X5R.
One thing that a lot of new FPV pilots don’t understand, is that ready-to-fly options are never going to be the drone you stay with forever. At some point, you’re going to want a part that will make your quad fly better in some way. You might want something simple like a motor which is fine, but things get complicated if you start trying to replace flight controllers, or get a completely new frame. That’s when it’s time to move to a DIY racing drone.
The TBS Vendetta is a quadcopter designed specifically for FPV (first person view) racing and freestyle flying. Today, you can find quite a few mini FPV racing drones that come ready to fly, but the Vendetta was one of the first racing drones to come out with everything you need to fly. It comes with almost everything you need to start learning to race. The only things that it won’t come with is a controller, battery, charger and FPV video goggles, but in the world of drone racing you’ll usually want to choose that stuff to fit your needs anyway.
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