All Mambos have a special mount on them that you can use to add on additional accessories. The newest accessory is the FPV camera. When combined with the included FPV goggles, the Mambo FPV allows you to fly the drone in a completely new way from other toy drones. You get to see what the drone sees and fly around as if you were inside the cockpit of the drone.
Most of the time, you will buy drones from Amazon.com or directly from the site of the drone manufacturer. Physical drone storefronts are less common, although they do exist. We have provided Amazon links for all of our drones, and since we’re affiliate partners with the site, we get a little bit of money if you use them. So if you like our writing and this guide has been helpful to you, please consider buying a drone using the links we provide!
The best drones combine the sheer exhilaration of flight (especially when experienced in conjunction with one of the best VR headsets) with the childlike joy you get steering an RC car around the open asphalt. The drone market has really boomed in the last few years, too, which means a growing range of options, whether you're a total beginner or a seasoned pro looking to enter your drone in a high-stakes drone racing league.

You can read our full review here for more detail, but here’s the gist of things: the Altair Aerial AA108 is the best drone for anyone who’s just getting started, and an excellent choice for more experienced fliers as well. It’s incredibly durable – something that’s very important for anyone who’s just getting started and is likely to crash often. It also has a very good range (100m) and flight time (8-10 minutes) considering that it costs less than $200.


There’s only one thing that the Parrot Mambo has that you won’t find on the Tello. Legos. Although DJI shows Lego blocks in their advertising photos, the Tello is not Lego block compatible like the Mambo is. For adults, this isn’t something you should care about, but if you’re buying the Tello for a kid who likes Lego, you might want to consider the Mambo instead.
If you’ve ever seen the live video feed on a racing drone, you’ll know that the video quality looks worse than a 20 year old tv broadcast. It’s really sad that professional pilots have to fly using such old technology, however Connex has been working on a solution to this problem for a few years now and the Falcore HD racing drone is the result of all their hard work.
It has a two notable video features. The first is called HDR. It’s similar to the HDR feature on the Mavic 2 Pro, but instead of shooting in a true HDR format for viewing on HDR TVs, the Anafi shoots in a standard color format that is for viewing on normal displays (not HDR displays). This means you will see more dynamic range in the video, but you won’t see anything special when viewing on an HDR TV like you do on the Mavic 2 Pro.
You should choose a drone that automatically returns when the battery is low, allowing you to avoid losing or crashing the device. This feature is called RTH for "return to home." Flight time can be as short as five minutes. It depends on the model. Most people will want at least 10 minutes of flight time. You can find models with a flight time as high as 35 minutes.
All Mambos have a special mount on them that you can use to add on additional accessories. The newest accessory is the FPV camera. When combined with the included FPV goggles, the Mambo FPV allows you to fly the drone in a completely new way from other toy drones. You get to see what the drone sees and fly around as if you were inside the cockpit of the drone.
The DJI Inspire 2 is aimed at professional cinematographers, news organizations, and independent filmmakers. And it's priced as such—its $3,000 MSRP doesn't include a camera. You have the option of adding a 1-inch sensor fixed-lens camera, a Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens model, or a Super35mm cinema mount with its own proprietary lens system and support for 6K video capture.
If you’ve heard of the Mavic Pro, you should already know that this is an amazing little drone. The design is great. The Mavic Air was made to be functional, but also look the part. With lines that resemble a high end sports car, there’s no other drone out there with a design this good, but looks aren’t what make this drone so great. At the end of the day, people want drones that are small, and the Mavic Air is beyond small; it’s tiny. It’s smaller than the Spark. Pictures don’t do justice. Some would even go as far as saying the Mavic Air is pocketable.
There’s only one thing that the Parrot Mambo has that you won’t find on the Tello. Legos. Although DJI shows Lego blocks in their advertising photos, the Tello is not Lego block compatible like the Mambo is. For adults, this isn’t something you should care about, but if you’re buying the Tello for a kid who likes Lego, you might want to consider the Mambo instead.

There isn’t much that the Inspire 2 CAN’T do. It comes standard with all of the features of the Phantom 4 Professional, but with a design optimized for performance and industry leading video features. It’s almost twice as big and twice as fast as the Phantom 4 (reaching speeds of almost 60MPH), and with it’s transforming design, the propellers will hardly ever appear in your videos. Additionally, the Inspire 2 comes with a dedicated FPV (first-person-view) camera so you can see where your flying at all times. With all of these features, you no longer have to blindly fly backward or sideways to get the shots you want.

×