The EVO from Autel Robotics is clearly copying the DJI Mavic series, but surprisingly this is more than just a subpar clone. Clearly the styling a little different from the Mavic 2 or Mavic Air. Just like the last drone Autel Robotics made (the X-Star Premium) the design of this thing looks very strange in my opinion. It comes in this bright orange color which is great for visibility, but some might argue it looks like a cheesy toy. Other than the color, the general design is pretty good. It folds into a small shape and has a full 3 axis gimbal just like the Mavic.
The EVO is an interesting drone. It doesn’t have all the features that the Mavic 2 and even the Mavic Air have, but the features that it does have are very useful. I think the price is a bit high for something that isn’t name brand, but I’m guessing that controller design is where a lot of the extra cost is going. If you need a drone that can fold up and do 4K 60FPS video, then the EVO might be the only drone for you. If you want to shoot the best looking videos possible and a more capable drone, I would still go with a Mavic 2 Zoom or Mavic 2 Pro.
It's no exaggeration to say that drones have changed the way we view the world. They've taken once difficult and expensive moviemaking techniques and made them accessible to anyone. Videos that once required a camera crew, expensive cranes, and hours of filming can now be done in minutes by the best drones with the tap of a single Auto Takeoff button.

 The Typhoon H is the biggest competitor to the Phantom 4 we’ve seen so far. It’s a 6 rotor retractable landing gear beast of a drone, with a 360 degree gimbal (similar to the Inspire 1). What makes it similar to the Phantom 4? Well both drones get over 20 minutes of flight time, have obstacle avoidance, decent video quality and are in the same price range.
The thing that makes the Mavic 2 Pro stand out from the Mavic 2 Zoom and all the other drones out there is the Hasselblad camera. If you aren’t familiar with Hasselblad, they’re a camera company that makes the best medium format cameras in the world. Hasselblad was actually bought by DJI a while back and now the two companies have worked together to create the Mavic 2 Pro camera.
There are some important features that make it great for beginners such as headless mode. This allows you to fly left or right by just pushing the controls left or right regardless of which way your drone is facing at the time. It has 2 speed modes in case you’re a beginner and are afraid you’re going to hit a tree. This feature is also useful for indoor flying. It has a bright LED light so you can see it from 100’s of feet away at night. When you first start out, you’re going to crash, so one of the nice things about this drone is that it comes complete with 4 spare blades. On that note, you can buy other parts for it as well such as motors, blades, batteries, protective guard, transmitter, and landing gear.
With an average flight time of 34 minutes, you’ve got plenty of time to set up shots and capture epic video. The specs are impressive too, with the Mavic Air 2 delivering 4K/60fps video on a three-axis gimbal for stability. Photos are crisp and clear, at 48MP resolution. It’s also the first drone with 8K HyperLapse capabilities. Although the footage isn’t as great in low-light, most of us are flying in daylight hours anyway.
Although many drone racers like building their own drones, you can find models suitable for racing, such as the UVify Draco, Aerix Black Talon 2.0, and Walkera F210 3D. A racing drone should be small, with good maneuverability and high-speed capability. Some racing drones come with a video headset, so you can guide the drone in first-person view. Most of these headsets can record video, allowing you to film and view your racing victories.
The flight time is 25 minutes of filming and it makes use of an intelligent Li-Po battery that charges 60% with the PD USB Type C charger. The design is a light carbon frame in an ultra-compact form, which takes it to speeds of 55 kmph in the Sport mode. There is a parrot Skycontroller 3 for remote control. Other features include Geofence, SmartRth, and Find-My-Drone. It is ergonomic and easy to use with the FreeFlight 6 app being powered by AI for automatically taking cinematic shots. GeoFence enables defining the virtual perimeter so that it does not fly out of the specified area. The Smart RTH means that it will return home if the battery is low.
The Vortex 285 is another drone from ImmersionRC. It’s actually one of the first ready-to-fly FPV racing drones that came to market back in 2015, but because of the features it has and the price, it’s still very relevant even today. It runs similar firmware to the Vortex 250 Pro, but the hardware is just slightly slower which means that it shouldn’t be as responsive.
It shoots 1080p video and stabilizes it using a mechanical gimbal. This makes the Spark much better at shooting video than drones that only rely on digital stabilization. You can get exactly the kind of shot you’re looking for by connecting the Spark to your phone via Wi-Fi and using the virtual joysticks, but there’s an easier way of shooting that can make even a beginner look like a pro.
This is the starter version of the Ryze Tello quadcopter. In addition, there are other versions available such as Essential, Professional, Advanced, Premium and Ultimate. It is a small and fast drone that comes with easy controls and comfortable remote control. You can fly it with an app, the Bluetooth remote or by using Scratch, a powerful programming language. Making use of the coding blocks for take-off, flying, turning, doing a flip or landing. The app can be used in iOS and Android phones, whereby the touch screen can be used for previewing images and controlling the drone. Pictures and videos are stored in the app, as there is no storage in the quadcopter. The drone is smart and interactive with videos having a resolution of 720 pixels and still images of 5 MP. Both of these are sharp and detailed. The app allows different modes like 8D flips, Up and Away, 360, Circle and Bounce mode. It is simple to use for beginners. The battery is powered at 1100 mAh and offers around 3 to 5 minutes of flight time.
The Nano doesn’t have the auto flipping functions that the Alias does, but that isn’t a problem since you can do flips manually and it’s more fun. Since the Nano QX is smaller than the Alias, it’s much cheaper. The only annoying thing about having a smaller quadcopter like the Nano QX is that it’s harder to see when flying far away, so it’s easier to lose orientation, but in general, it’s still a good quadcopter to learn with, especially since you can also use it with any DSMX RC transmitter.

But what really sets the AA108 apart is its wide range of extra features that make it prefect for users at any skill level. Beginners can take advantage of its headless and altitude hold modes to help with the steep learning curve that comes with flying your first quadcopter. Advanced users can set it at the higher speed setting to see what the aircraft can really do, taking advantage of the high-quality HD camera features and custom pathing to get great footage and pull off amazing stunts.

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