The Mavic Air takes most of the features DJI has implemented in their Pro drone line and just packs them into a much smaller package. It isn’t exactly mini-drone sized when it’s fully unfolded, but once folded up, DJI touts a size no taller or thicker than the average smartphone. Even the intuitive controller folds up to a smaller size, too, so clearly, DJI was building this drone with portability in mind.
Even if you have no good reason to justify buying one, you have to admit that drones are cool. Some are glorified tech toys, but most models we highlight here are fit for use in imaging and cinematic applications small and large. If you think you can use a flying camera in your next project, there's some good news—the tech has come a long way in a very short time. There are models on the market now that put earlier copters to shame in terms of video quality and stabilization.
You should choose a drone that automatically returns when the battery is low, allowing you to avoid losing or crashing the device. This feature is called RTH for "return to home." Flight time can be as short as five minutes. It depends on the model. Most people will want at least 10 minutes of flight time. You can find models with a flight time as high as 35 minutes.
A lot of people also asked about the charger and whether or not they would need to buy one, but the drone comes with a USB charger that connects the drone to the remote. One user even commented saying that they were using a phone charger cord, which is a great replacement if the original cord breaks. You will need 6 AA batteries for the remote itself, so make sure you stock up!

If you want to take drone activity to new heights (literally), the DJI Mavic 2 Pro makes a pretty great splurge. This drone is an evolution of its predecessor, capable of staying airborne for 31 minutes and hitting speeds of 44 miles per hour during flight — faster the previous generation. But we think drone aficionados will find their true joy in the new DJI software. Features like ActiveTrack 2.0 assist the drone with following moving subjects autonomously. Seeing real-time video is better than ever in 1080p with the addition of OcuSync 2.0, and eight gigabytes of storage (with SD card capacity up to 128GB) allow for plenty of HD footage or images from the 20MP camera. 


It is the perfect camera drone for anyone, with all the core features and available at a reasonable price. The camera range and controller are excellent and it is compact enough to throw in a bag and travel. That is the major selling point of the Mini. The main features are a 30-minute flight time, an HD video transmission of 4 km, 3-axis gimbal with a 2.7K camera and physical controllers working with Android and iOS phones.
With a reasonable flight time of 30 minutes and a range of 11 miles, you’ve got a lot to work with in terms of setting up your shot and creating sweeping artistic videography. While larger than some of the other drones reviewed here, it’s able to fold and should fit in a large backpack. It’s easy to control and fly, with accurate obstacle detection and top speeds of 45 mph.
The Vortex 285 is another drone from ImmersionRC. It’s actually one of the first ready-to-fly FPV racing drones that came to market back in 2015, but because of the features it has and the price, it’s still very relevant even today. It runs similar firmware to the Vortex 250 Pro, but the hardware is just slightly slower which means that it shouldn’t be as responsive.
Yes, the main feature of the Falcore is the video streaming quality, and that alone is a good enough reason to want this drone, but there’s some other features that make it great for beginners as well. The new SHIELD mode is something we’ve never seen in a racing drone before. It’s a flying mode that uses ultrasonic sensors to keep the Falcore at about 3 feet from the ground at all times. It also mixes the roll and yaw controls together, so you can fly with only one control stick ( left/right and forward/backward). This makes flying the Falcore more like driving an RC car!
Yes, the main feature of the Falcore is the video streaming quality, and that alone is a good enough reason to want this drone, but there’s some other features that make it great for beginners as well. The new SHIELD mode is something we’ve never seen in a racing drone before. It’s a flying mode that uses ultrasonic sensors to keep the Falcore at about 3 feet from the ground at all times. It also mixes the roll and yaw controls together, so you can fly with only one control stick ( left/right and forward/backward). This makes flying the Falcore more like driving an RC car!
This is truly a fantastic headset for gaming. I'm really happy with the audio and mic quality and the build is very comfortable for long sessions. Beyond a mute button for the mic, there is no control panel for the device to control the volume and other settings; all that has to be done through your pc/console. Things to note for PS4 specifically are the lack of surround sound functionality when using this headset with the system and also the headset by default uses microphone monitoring. This feature provides real time feedback of your own voice and other sounds in the mics radius to let the user gauge their own voice volume, this is a helpful way to counter your inability to hear your natural voice due to noise cancelation. If this is a feature you don't like than know that the PS4 can't turn it off for this specific ... full review

The EVO is an interesting drone. It doesn’t have all the features that the Mavic 2 and even the Mavic Air have, but the features that it does have are very useful. I think the price is a bit high for something that isn’t name brand, but I’m guessing that controller design is where a lot of the extra cost is going. If you need a drone that can fold up and do 4K 60FPS video, then the EVO might be the only drone for you. If you want to shoot the best looking videos possible and a more capable drone, I would still go with a Mavic 2 Zoom or Mavic 2 Pro.
You should choose a drone that automatically returns when the battery is low, allowing you to avoid losing or crashing the device. This feature is called RTH for "return to home." Flight time can be as short as five minutes. It depends on the model. Most people will want at least 10 minutes of flight time. You can find models with a flight time as high as 35 minutes.
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Drone and gimbal technology has spread across a diverse range of businesses and professional enterprise. Creative agencies, construction firms, and the public safety sectors are just an example of some industries that have embraced drone and gimbal technology. To help support enterprises of every type, DJI offers the Corporate Purchase Program, providing cost-effective solutions for organizations. This program is currently available in the USA, Canada, Mainland China and the EU (excluding the UK). Click here to apply.
If you’re looking for the perfect drone to take your creativity to the next level, or if you work in videography, look no further than the DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2.0. The advanced camera features, including 20 megapixels, 4K video, and an accurate mechanical shutter put it on par with many traditional cameras. It delivers stunning video and images that any photographer would be proud of.
My wife bought this for me for my birthday last week. She'd noticed me looking at drones in the store, and I'd told her about the mini-drones I'd seen some of the local high school students playing with, but she also knew I was concerned about getting something that would break on first impact - having never flown one before, I knew it was inevitable I'd end up crashing it a few times.
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