Every adventure needs a Spark of creativity! Spark is a mini drone that is great for taking quick selfies. With Gesture mode, you can use simple hand gestures to get Spark to follow you, take photos, and record videos. Spark can be operated without a controller, but if you prefer more traditional operation, you can fly with a remote controller or use your smartphone.

Camera drones are useful for amateur and professional photographers and videographers, as they are able to shoot from different and difficult angles, which is not possible with traditional cameras. You can shoot from anywhere, provided you get the required permissions and take any angle on the subject with the slick features available on the camera drones. You don’t have to climb trees anymore to get that beautiful panoramic view. Today, drone technology has become less expensive and due to its increasing popularity, most enthusiasts are able to afford it. Small indoor drones come with simple cameras, but they can only take low-quality pictures, whereas the larger ones can shoot at 1080p HD or more and have controllers. Let’s check out some of the best camera drones.

With a reasonable flight time of 30 minutes and a range of 11 miles, you’ve got a lot to work with in terms of setting up your shot and creating sweeping artistic videography. While larger than some of the other drones reviewed here, it’s able to fold and should fit in a large backpack. It’s easy to control and fly, with accurate obstacle detection and top speeds of 45 mph.

But what really sets the AA108 apart is its wide range of extra features that make it prefect for users at any skill level. Beginners can take advantage of its headless and altitude hold modes to help with the steep learning curve that comes with flying your first quadcopter. Advanced users can set it at the higher speed setting to see what the aircraft can really do, taking advantage of the high-quality HD camera features and custom pathing to get great footage and pull off amazing stunts. 

A key part of our evaluation is testing out various flight modes, and putting the battery life to the test to see if it lives up to expected flight time and range. More advanced drones may have pilot assistance systems and the ability to perform advanced flight maneuvers, which is something we also test. If the drone includes a camera built-in we use it and evaluate the camera resolution, focus, tracking, frame rate, and other key features. Finally, we take a look at the price of the drone and compare its features to a competitor in the same range to make our final judgement. All of the drones we test are purchased by Lifewire; none are provided by the manufacturer.
It is a good time to get yourself a camera drone in 2020. The best UAV companies are continuously trying to impress the market with unique and innovative camera drone models that not only have great features but are also reliable and intuitive. What’s more, prices of camera drones have come down. You can buy an entry-level camera drone for less than $400 USD. For above $1000 USD you can purchase a professional drone with professional image quality and performance.
You get up to 9 minutes of flight time, have a 640x480p camera, and video capabilities that lack audio as there is no microphone. You can do flips in the air at the touch of a button on the transmitter, and there is a button that lets you share a video on social media instantly. The LED lights located at the center of each propeller and the headlight are pretty useful for flying at night, too.
With brushless motors, they almost never fail because there aren’t any brushes inside to burn out! They are also much more efficient than brushed motors which means more power and more flight time! So what does this mean for the Bugs 3? Well, Unlike all the other toy drones, the bugs 3 gets over 15 minutes of flight time, so you can focus more on flying instead of changing batteries. 
Our expert reviewer and tester evaluate drones on a number of factors. For starters, we examine the size and design, taking into account my many rotors the drone has, how portable it is, and if it comes with an included remote control or camera. Next, take it out to a park or wilderness area and test how easy it is to learn and fly. We pay attention to the learning curve of learning the control, and how much latency there is in video transmission (if the controller has such a feature). We also look at flight capabilities like omnidirectaonal sensing, obstacle avoidance, tracking, and automatic landing.
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