The Phantom 3 Pro shoots video at 4K, 3820 x 2160 pixels on a fully stabilized, 3-axis gimbal. You can shoot 4K videos of up to 30 fps and take 12 MP photos. Besides, it has a vision positioning system enabling a stable flight experience indoors as well, whereby you can fly it low to the ground in GPS free areas. Live viewing at 720 pixels is possible with Lightbridge digital streaming, along with full-resolution videos getting recorded in the microSD card. It also comes along with a flight battery and remote control that is rechargeable.
If you’re looking for a drone for sale with a unique and stylish appearance, then look no further than Force1’s XDR220 FPV quadcopter. This easy-to-assemble FPV racing drone kit comes with everything you need – including a camera – right out of the box, except for the battery. That’s actually a good thing, because you can try a number of different LiPo batteries to gain the speed and overall movement that you want. You can customize this racing drone for sale to act however you want it to!
You might not be able to spend so much on a drone like the Mavic Air 2, but its great collision-avoidance tech is why we made it our top pick. For a more affordable option, the Mavic Mini (8/10, WIRED Recommends) from DJI is also a great choice (and our previous favorite). It flies nearly as well as its larger siblings, though wind gusts that wouldn't faze the Mavic 2 Pro will ground the Mini. There's also no 4K video and no front and rear collision-avoidance sensors like you'll find in more expensive drones.

The F181 includes 2 batteries, and two charging cables. One of the great things about this drone is that you can charge one of the batteries while still in the drone, and charge the other battery with the other USB charging cable. It also comes with extra blades, landing skids, and the screwdriver for assembling everything. There are other accessories available such as extra motors, batteries, charger, blades and other spare parts.
The battery on the F181 will last about 7-9 minutes and takes about 80 minutes to charge. This quad actually comes with an extra battery, but according to the manufacturer, you should wait 10 minutes between flights otherwise the motors and circuit board may overheat. This was reiterated by the reviews we have seen by others who were disappointed that their motors overheated on the first day. Customer service does appear to be excellent in dealing with these types of problems.
Battery life - Battery life is a factor that many drone manufacturers are still trying to nail down. Some drones can only fly for six to eight minutes, while more powerful ones can last up to 30 minutes. If you’re worried about the battery life, look for one with a “return to home” feature, which automatically directs the drone back home when the battery gets too low.

The price for this little drone is only about $30. It’s one of the cheapest quadcopters you can buy (but cheap isn’t necessarily a good thing). It’s very fast for how small it is, but at the same time since the rotors are so small and close together, people have found that it’s a bit hard to do bank turns with it. Since the Proto X is so cheap, there is a chance that you could buy a defective one, but you can always just send it back.
Removable cameras: In some models, users can remove the cameras and fly the drone without the camera attached, excellent if this is a gift for a beginner who still needs to learn to fly. This helps to reduce the weight of the drone, thus enabling longer flights. More importantly, this feature enables camera upgrades when there are advances in the technology. Perhaps your gift to mom or dad next year will be just such an upgrade.
The FPV camera is nothing special, but it’s nice that it’s included. It’s a 600TVN camera with a 120 degree field-of-view. The video transmitter is 5.8ghz 25mW with 40 channels, so it will work with any FPV goggles or video receiver you have. I would’ve liked to have seen a 150mW video transmitter for better penetration through walls, but the 25mW is still enough to have a lot of fun with.
To be sure, you don’t want to lose any of the fruits of your drone’s flight recordings, so it might be a good idea to have microSD cards with you for plenty of storage. You can choose an app-controlled drone if you’re interested in having access to advanced in-flight features and aren’t concerned with the shorter range that goes along with using Bluetooth or Wi-Fi. Regardless of which drone you select, you’ll want to consider getting a drone case to protect it against moisture, dust and impact damage.
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Flight Autonomy is more than just obstacle avoidance. We look at the basics first. Things like whether or not the drone has self leveling capabilities, GPS, or return-to-home features are obvious on the camera drones, but for the toy and racing drones, you will see that they get lower ratings for not having these features. We also look at things like obstacle avoidance, visual tracking, sensor redundancy and more.
The Phantom 3 Pro shoots video at 4K, 3820 x 2160 pixels on a fully stabilized, 3-axis gimbal. You can shoot 4K videos of up to 30 fps and take 12 MP photos. Besides, it has a vision positioning system enabling a stable flight experience indoors as well, whereby you can fly it low to the ground in GPS free areas. Live viewing at 720 pixels is possible with Lightbridge digital streaming, along with full-resolution videos getting recorded in the microSD card. It also comes along with a flight battery and remote control that is rechargeable.
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