If you want to take drone activity to new heights (literally), the DJI Mavic 2 Pro makes a pretty great splurge. This drone is an evolution of its predecessor, capable of staying airborne for 31 minutes and hitting speeds of 44 miles per hour during flight — faster the previous generation. But we think drone aficionados will find their true joy in the new DJI software. Features like ActiveTrack 2.0 assist the drone with following moving subjects autonomously. Seeing real-time video is better than ever in 1080p with the addition of OcuSync 2.0, and eight gigabytes of storage (with SD card capacity up to 128GB) allow for plenty of HD footage or images from the 20MP camera. 
The JJRC H26WM is a great drone for beginners or those who want a casual drone to zip around with. The camera is pretty decent but nothing too fancy, so don’t expect the world from it. The maximum amount of flight time you can get is approximately 7 minutes, so having an extra battery is a good idea. The camera allows for 2MP in FPV which swings around in all directions.

The HS170 does quite well in windier conditions so it would be good for indoor or outdoor use. It has a range of about 100-165 feet, flying time about 6-8 minutes, and a charging time of about 60-80 minutes. The HS170 is not a camera drone, but it has many other features. You can turn the LED lights off and on from the remote control. It has headless flight system, 3 flight modes for different skill levels, and one button flip and roll controls.

Removable cameras: In some models, users can remove the cameras and fly the drone without the camera attached, excellent if this is a gift for a beginner who still needs to learn to fly. This helps to reduce the weight of the drone, thus enabling longer flights. More importantly, this feature enables camera upgrades when there are advances in the technology. Perhaps your gift to mom or dad next year will be just such an upgrade.
Almost every piece of electronics has been modified from the Vortex 250 Pro and big improvements have been made—starting with the flight controller. It’s an all new design called Synergy, with duel F3 processors for faster 8KHz update rates. Because of this, it also comes with Bataflight firmware pre installed instead of Cleanflight. If you didn’t understand any of that, just know that this drone will fly super locked-in.

On-screen-displays have become pretty standard for ready-to-fly racing drones, but this time the OSD and video transmitter has been integrated into the Synergy flight controller to simplify the design and reduce weight. If you know about FPV, having an integrated video TX might scare you. After all, video transmitters do tend to burn out. Thankfully ImmersionRC has a great feature built into the video transmitter that eliminates this issue.
But that’s not all! You aren’t just paying for an electronic Lego mount. The mambo is much easier to fly than most toy drones. Thanks to the powerful onboard processor, the bottom facing camera and an ultrasonic sensor, it can hover in place and hold its position without needing to make any corrections. Speaking of sensors, although the Mambo doesn’t have a front facing camera, you can still see the video feed from the bottom facing camera on your smartphone.
My wife bought this for me for my birthday last week. She'd noticed me looking at drones in the store, and I'd told her about the mini-drones I'd seen some of the local high school students playing with, but she also knew I was concerned about getting something that would break on first impact - having never flown one before, I knew it was inevitable I'd end up crashing it a few times.
The Mavic Air takes most of the features DJI has implemented in their Pro drone line and just packs them into a much smaller package. It isn’t exactly mini-drone sized when it’s fully unfolded, but once folded up, DJI touts a size no taller or thicker than the average smartphone. Even the intuitive controller folds up to a smaller size, too, so clearly, DJI was building this drone with portability in mind.
The JJRC H26WM is a great drone for beginners or those who want a casual drone to zip around with. The camera is pretty decent but nothing too fancy, so don’t expect the world from it. The maximum amount of flight time you can get is approximately 7 minutes, so having an extra battery is a good idea. The camera allows for 2MP in FPV which swings around in all directions.
There are a lot of things I haven’t mentioned, like the quick release arms that come off for easy transportation, or the included battery charger, but overall I think the Falcore is a great drone for beginners and it’s amazing that they were able to put such an expensive video transmission system in an affordable ready-to-fly racing drone. With the tilted motor design, I wouldn’t recommend the Falcore for freestyle stunt flying (get a Vortex 180 or build your own drone for freestyle), but as a racing drone for intermediate pilots and especially beginners, this quad is a great option.
The mini drone has a bunch of built-in quick shot functions that let the unit fly itself in preprogrammed aerial patterns, and DJI has even created a SmartCapture mode which lets you control the craft with hand gestures. Hook it up to the DJI Fly app and you can even control the drone with some cool features there, including a tap-to-fly option where you literally touch the place on the camera you want the copter to fly. The whole thing weighs only 430g — a true marvel of engineering for its size. Pick up this package on Amazon and you’ll get everything you need to start filming amazing flight-perspective vistas. 

Good camera drones are powerful tools that have high-definition camera settings for industry-leading image quality. Sensor size, ISO range, shutter speed, photography modes, and more decide which bracket the camera drone will fit. Professional level camera drones will have 1 inch sensors and are able to capture at least 12 megapixels photographs and video in 4K or even 5.2K and RAW formats.
The Vendetta is a drone that’s going to be hard to break, but if it does, no problem! It’s one of the only drones that doesn’t require a soldering iron when you need to replace components after crashing. This is a big deal for racing drones, because you’re always crashing and repairing parts at racing events, or even just at the park. Because of its modular design, you can also upgrade to bigger motors, add a high-voltage battery, and instantly have a faster machine.
With a reasonable flight time of 30 minutes and a range of 11 miles, you’ve got a lot to work with in terms of setting up your shot and creating sweeping artistic videography. While larger than some of the other drones reviewed here, it’s able to fold and should fit in a large backpack. It’s easy to control and fly, with accurate obstacle detection and top speeds of 45 mph.
The Dolly Zoom enables capturing both wide-angle and mid-range shots. It includes a 3-axis gimbal for providing stable footage whatever the situation may be. The total flight time is 31 minutes, which is the longest for consumer drones today. It has a maximum speed of 72 kmph in Sport mode and also includes a low-noise technology during flight. Other features include an Active Track 2.0 and high-speed tracking abilities for speeds up to 27 kmph. Aerial shots are taken and processed automatically with the Hyperlapse feature. Another useful feature is obstacle avoidance sensors that sense obstacles around the object. It is capable of planning its path on a 3D map and can recognize and move away from obstacles in the front or from behind.

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I've bought about a dozen or more different micro drones over the last two years and would put this one at the top of the pack. I read the reviews and saw the problems with the charging port. As a result I've made an effort to be gentle with the charging port and have had no probles at all et. Altitude hold is a terrific feature for beginners just learning to fly these things. The auto take-off is another big plus. Very smooth acceleration was a surprise at first, after flying it for the first 5 min's I decided I liked the way it handled better than any micro drone I've owned. Slightly less flight time and a bit bigger mean it's not as 'zippy' as some like the Aukey but when flying indoor's that just translates to fewer impacts with walls and other objects. The prop guards ... full review
Your purchase choices may be driven by politics, but we look more closely at product performance and value. The price of DJI drones recently increased across the board for US customers, a response to increases in import tariffs. As result, competing drones from Autel, Parrot, and Yuneec are more compelling alternatives, as their prices have not yet ticked upward.

If you like the design of the Inspire 2, but just can’t afford it, you might also consider buying the Inspire 1. It’s obviously nowhere near as good as the Inspire 2 if you compare the features, but the video quality you can get from the older X5 camera is still in a lot of cases better than the Phantom 4 Pro. DJI also makes hi-zoom and thermal imaging cameras that work with the Inspire 1, in case you need something for agriculture or search-and-rescue use.
Drones aren't just flying cameras, though; they're also the modern version of remote-controlled vehicles. And again, they've made flying easier and more accessible, thanks to intelligent collision sensors that protect your investment from mishaps. There are a dizzying array of drones available, but there is a basic division to be aware of—cheaper drones, while fun, will never fly as well or deliver the kind of video and photo results possible with more expensive models. With drones, you get what you pay for. That said, if you're not worried about wowing YouTube with your sweeping panoramic masterpiece, you don't have to spend a fortune to get a good, fun drone. Here are the best drones I've tested for every budget.
One really cool feature of the Mavic 2 is the bottom facing LED fill lights. This is something that you have to see in person to truly appreciate. These LED lights are like having a full size room light hanging from the bottom of your drone. These lights help the Mavic see in the dark when landing, but you can also turn them on and off manually from the controller.
This is one of the most unique drones I’ve seen in a while. Instead of having a quadcopter design like all the other drones, the Parrot Disco is a flying wing. Unlike other flying wings, the Disco is very easy to fly thanks to Parrots flight controller which uses all of the same sensors found on a typical camera drone. since the Disco is technically a plane, it can’t stop while flying and it can’t take off vertically either. To launch it, you throw it forward and it automatically flies itself until you take over the controls.
If the Mavic 2 Pro didn’t exist, I would say this is obviously the best drone of all time. It’s not as compact as the Mavic Air, but the extra features more than make up for it. It’s a true workhorse, which is probably why DJI created an enterprise drone based on the Mavic 2 Zoom. There’s really nothing I can find to complain about with the Mavic 2 Zoom other than the fact that the Mavic 2 Pro has better video quality. But if that extra bump in quality isn’t worth the extra $250, go with the Mavic 2 Zoom.
The Inspire 1 is an old drone. In fact, It’s almost 3 years old now and yet there’s still no other drone that has all of the same functionality in a ready-to-fly package. You could say that the Inspire 2 replaces the Inspire 1, but with a starting price of $3,000 that can easily go up to $10,000 if you want the best camera option, not all film makers can afford it. That’s the main reason why the Inspire 1 is still relevant, but there’s more. The inspire 2 can’t hold the Zenmuse Z30 or the Zenmuse XT cameras for long zoom and thermal imaging.
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