Drone technology has rapidly developed in recent years, opening up exciting possibilities for budding pilots, filmmakers, and industry professionals. This article presents a roundup of some of the most popular remote-controlled drones for sale on the market. Whether you’re looking for a small portable drone for everyday use or an advanced filmmaking drone, check out the drone recommendations below.


This drone is small and cute but pretty durable and very safe for young kids. It’s more suited for indoor use because wind can be a problem due to its small size and the ducted fan design. Some complain that it doesn’t have a hover feature, but neither do other drones in it’s price point. For the price, its a great choice if you want to have some fun with a drone that’s not going to break the bank.
You can read our full review here for more detail, but here’s the gist of things: the Altair Aerial AA108 is the best drone for anyone who’s just getting started, and an excellent choice for more experienced fliers as well. It’s incredibly durable – something that’s very important for anyone who’s just getting started and is likely to crash often. It also has a very good range (100m) and flight time (8-10 minutes) considering that it costs less than $200.
The F181 includes 2 batteries, and two charging cables. One of the great things about this drone is that you can charge one of the batteries while still in the drone, and charge the other battery with the other USB charging cable. It also comes with extra blades, landing skids, and the screwdriver for assembling everything. There are other accessories available such as extra motors, batteries, charger, blades and other spare parts.

Flight Autonomy is more than just obstacle avoidance. We look at the basics first. Things like whether or not the drone has self leveling capabilities, GPS, or return-to-home features are obvious on the camera drones, but for the toy and racing drones, you will see that they get lower ratings for not having these features. We also look at things like obstacle avoidance, visual tracking, sensor redundancy and more.


If image quality is your priority, then you might opt for the Mavic 2 Pro over the Zoom. The 2 Pro is equipped with a 1” CMOS, 20-megapixel camera co-engineered in partnership with Hasselblad, the world’s leading manufacturer of medium format cameras and lenses. The Zoom’s camera system is still professional-grade however, with a 1/2.3” CMOS, 12-megapixel sensor.
This category is better for those who need drones for commercial reasons, possibly for recording clips for an advertisement or a picture for their business’ profile, for example, or for residential fliers who want the best camera drone on the market. These camera drones for sale are professional in all aspects, with both the camera and the drone being high tech in accordance with the design.
DJI's Phantom drones feel like monoliths from another era, and they may well be—the company hasn't released a significant update to the Phantom line in nearly four years. Still, if you're a video or drone professional, the Phantom 4 Pro V2 (8/10 WIRED Recommends) is the drone to get. It's like flying a rock, and I mean that in the best way possible. The Phantom 4 Pro is stable and responsive; shoots incredible, cinema-quality footage; and is practically smart enough to fly without you. It may not generate much buzz these days, but the Phantom remains an excellent choice that won't let you down.
If drone racing and freestyle flying sounds like something crazy you would see in a movie, you’re right! If you’re even considering getting into the sport of drone racing, do it! This is the intense, fast paced, super addictive side of drone flying. Racing drones are like race-cars. They will take a lot more research and time than any other type of drone to start out with, but the experience you get when flying is unlike anything else in the world.
Drones with cameras have revolutionized the field of aerial photography. Getting that perfect bird’s-eye-view perspective in a photo or video is a lot safer when it doesn’t involve risking life and limb in an airplane or helicopter. Drones have also made it possible to get shots that are impossible for traditional camera setups – tilting and whirling quickly with 360 degrees of motion. Dronethusiast drone reviews is taking on the top camera drones on the market today so read on!
The DJI Phantom series drones are some of the most capable and recognizable drones on the market. The Phantom 1 was a revolutionary aircraft that put DJI and prosumer drones on the map. The Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 has collectively built on the series success and continues to be used for photography, filmmaking, inspections, and various other applications.
With a reasonable flight time of 30 minutes and a range of 11 miles, you’ve got a lot to work with in terms of setting up your shot and creating sweeping artistic videography. While larger than some of the other drones reviewed here, it’s able to fold and should fit in a large backpack. It’s easy to control and fly, with accurate obstacle detection and top speeds of 45 mph.
The Mavic Air is an excellent camera drone for those on the go, offering a foldable design and a powerful 4K camera. Built to accompany you on any adventure, the Mavic Air is smaller than the Mavic Pro and offers many of the same great features. This camera drone can capture crystal-clear 32MP Sphere Panoramas by stitching 25 images together. The sky can’t be captured due to the limited gimbal tilt range, but a zenith stitching algorithm completes the full 360° shot.

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Camera drones are petite machines that allow you to survey the surroundings from a height and can take magnificent aerial pictures and videos. If you are a beginner, get one under $50 to learn the basics and later you can move on to something more expensive in the range of $500 to $1500. Professional drones are used by filmmakers and cost a lot but offer excellent video quality, specs, and speeds. However, users need to know about the drone tech. Check out the features like battery life, cost of batteries, brushless motors for quieter operation, camera specifications (whether attached or built-in), Headless mode, integrated GPS, Follow-Me mode, integrated gimbal for keeping it steady in high winds, obstacle avoiding features, range, and so on. Remember that all drone users must register their aircraft if it is over 250gm and must follow the rules and regulations that apply. Happy shooting! Fly safely and responsibly.

Just like all of the drones from ImmersionRC, the Vortex 180 is an extremely well-built ready-to-fly racing drone with all of the features that beginners and pros need. The first thing you’ll notice from the older Vortex quadcopters is the cleaner design. All of the electronics are sandwiched between the carbon fiber on the top and the printed circuit board on the bottom. The only thing that sticks out is the camera which is protected by a hard plastic case.

As the name implies, the Breeze shoots 4K video, and honestly it looks really good! The only down side is that there's no gimbal, so you don’t get image stabilization, so everything will be shaky looking unless you use special editing software to stabilize the video. There is a 1080p mode with stabilization, but I found that it doesn’t work all that well. For smooth shots, the DJI Spark wins, but the ability to shoot in 4K does allow the Breeze to get some decent shots if you know how to stabilize them.
The best camera drones in 2020 are equipped with a handful of smart flight features. These make capturing stunning footage in difficult situations much easier and fun. For example, for times when you are shooting fast-moving objects, a feature like ActiveTrack will direct the camera drone to recognize and track a subject while keeping it in the frame. There are a variety of other intelligent features available on camera drones, so do be sure to check those out before buying yours.
The FPV camera is nothing special, but it’s nice that it’s included. It’s a 600TVN camera with a 120 degree field-of-view. The video transmitter is 5.8ghz 25mW with 40 channels, so it will work with any FPV goggles or video receiver you have. I would’ve liked to have seen a 150mW video transmitter for better penetration through walls, but the 25mW is still enough to have a lot of fun with.
You should choose a drone that automatically returns when the battery is low, allowing you to avoid losing or crashing the device. This feature is called RTH for "return to home." Flight time can be as short as five minutes. It depends on the model. Most people will want at least 10 minutes of flight time. You can find models with a flight time as high as 35 minutes.
It shoots 1080p video and stabilizes it using a mechanical gimbal. This makes the Spark much better at shooting video than drones that only rely on digital stabilization. You can get exactly the kind of shot you’re looking for by connecting the Spark to your phone via Wi-Fi and using the virtual joysticks, but there’s an easier way of shooting that can make even a beginner look like a pro.
There isn’t much that the Inspire 2 CAN’T do. It comes standard with all of the features of the Phantom 4 Professional, but with a design optimized for performance and industry leading video features. It’s almost twice as big and twice as fast as the Phantom 4 (reaching speeds of almost 60MPH), and with it’s transforming design, the propellers will hardly ever appear in your videos. Additionally, the Inspire 2 comes with a dedicated FPV (first-person-view) camera so you can see where your flying at all times. With all of these features, you no longer have to blindly fly backward or sideways to get the shots you want.
It is easy to fly the quad. You just hold it in front of you and double tap on the power button. The camera scans the surroundings and locks onto your face and then spins the propellers. The gesture control works remarkably well and all it needs is just some practice related to the gestures. The gestures are cool but limited to a few actions useful for taking a quick selfie or a video clip. For other actions, you can use the DJI app. There are different flight modes to select from and with ActiveTrack, it can be set to follow you or any other subject selected from the screen.
The Blackhawk is a fast and durable drone with an action camera mount that’s compatible with a GoPro Hero 3 or 4. It’s a good camera drone thanks to a very stable hover and quiet brushless motors (which allow for better field recordings of audio), but it really shines thanks to a 300 meter range and 15 minutes of flight time. This is a more advanced drone than the 818 Plus that may not be for everyone and certainly won’t be for beginners. However, if you’re ready to graduate to a more hardcore offering and don’t want to put a huge dent in your wallet, this is an excellent drone available for under $120 and among the best budget long range drones for sale.
The Mavic Air 2 (9/10 WIRED Recommends) is the drone that most people should buy. It's portable and lightweight, but it still manages to pack in a brilliant half-inch sensor for high quality images and video. Tons of automated features mean you can just fly and get the images you want, or shoot video and let the drone avoid obstacles and track your subject. You'll even get 60 frames-per-second 4K video—something that still isn't available in the more expensive Mavic 2 Pro—and Spotlight, a powerful automated flight mode pulled from DJI's pro-grade Inspire drone.
Having a larger sensor is nice, but for me, what really sets the Mavic 2 Pro apart from the other drones out there is the Hasselblad color science. Even if you don’t know how to work with colors in your editing software, the colors that come out of this camera are amazing just as they are with no editing.weather you’re taking pictures or video, Hasselblad’s color science is embedded throughout all the shooting modes.
The Phantom 4 is an impressive photography drone that features a 1/2.3-inch CMOS sensor, 4K 30fps video, and 12MP stills. If you don’t require 4K video, there are also options to shoot in 2K, Full HD, or 720p. The 12MP sensor on the Phantom 4 camera has an ISO range of 100-1600, and the camera also supports auto exposure bracketing, EV bias, and HDR imaging.
There are a few downsides to this drone, the main one being the price. At $1,999 USD, not everyone will be able to afford it. It also uses a 2 axis gimbal, so panning motion is not very smooth. Since it doesn’t have a controller, that also means you can’t fly the drone farther than wifi range will allow. The biggest issue with this drone in my opinion is the size It’s not much larger than the Mavic 2 when unfolded, but that’s the problem, it doesn’t fold up at all. This means if you want to fit it into a camera bag or small backpack, you’re just out of luck.
DJI refurbished products are available at reduced prices, while simultaneously meeting performance and quality standards. The refurbished products are thoroughly tested before they are sold, and they include a full standard product warranty and new packaging. And if you’re not happy with your refurbished product, you can return it within seven days (just make sure that you haven’t activated it yet).
The Contixo F18 Advanced GPS Quadcopter is loaded with interesting features that make this drone a great value compared to similar drones on the market. Thanks to built-in GPS, the F18 knows its location and where it is in relation to you. The return-to-home system commands the drone to move back to the home point when the battery gets too low or when the control signal goes out of range, so you are less likely to lose your drone after a long day of flying. Four powerful brushless motors give it the ability to quickly gain or drop in altitude and stop on a dime, yet they consume less battery life than non-brushless motors so you can fly longer. The onboard FPV FHD camera gives you a drone’s eye view – simply link the camera to the Contixo F18 app and the 5.0GHz band Wi-Fi beams you real-time images with zero latency up to 500 meters away. 

The Inspire 1 is an old drone. In fact, It’s almost 3 years old now and yet there’s still no other drone that has all of the same functionality in a ready-to-fly package. You could say that the Inspire 2 replaces the Inspire 1, but with a starting price of $3,000 that can easily go up to $10,000 if you want the best camera option, not all film makers can afford it. That’s the main reason why the Inspire 1 is still relevant, but there’s more. The inspire 2 can’t hold the Zenmuse Z30 or the Zenmuse XT cameras for long zoom and thermal imaging.
The Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 also comes with an option to purchase the remote controller with an in-built screen. The ultra-bright 5.5-inch screen is easily visible in direct sunlight. The DJI Go 4 app is in-built into the screen, so you don't need a smartphone to operate the aircraft. The remote control has up to five hours of battery life, which gives you a comprehensive camera drone suitable for advanced aerial photography
The FPV camera is nothing special, but it’s nice that it’s included. It’s a 600TVN camera with a 120 degree field-of-view. The video transmitter is 5.8ghz 25mW with 40 channels, so it will work with any FPV goggles or video receiver you have. I would’ve liked to have seen a 150mW video transmitter for better penetration through walls, but the 25mW is still enough to have a lot of fun with.
It does include a camera, although not the greatest quality but still fun to play around with. This drone, like many others also has a headless feature, but also features an altitude hold function or hover which is something most of the less expensive drones do not have. This is especially useful when trying to learn how to hover. FPV is not possible with the small LCD display on the controller but it does give you some vital information about the drone during flight.
The Mavic Air is an excellent camera drone for those on the go, offering a foldable design and a powerful 4K camera. Built to accompany you on any adventure, the Mavic Air is smaller than the Mavic Pro and offers many of the same great features. This camera drone can capture crystal-clear 32MP Sphere Panoramas by stitching 25 images together. The sky can’t be captured due to the limited gimbal tilt range, but a zenith stitching algorithm completes the full 360° shot.
There isn’t much that the Inspire 2 CAN’T do. It comes standard with all of the features of the Phantom 4 Professional, but with a design optimized for performance and industry leading video features. It’s almost twice as big and twice as fast as the Phantom 4 (reaching speeds of almost 60MPH), and with it’s transforming design, the propellers will hardly ever appear in your videos. Additionally, the Inspire 2 comes with a dedicated FPV (first-person-view) camera so you can see where your flying at all times. With all of these features, you no longer have to blindly fly backward or sideways to get the shots you want.

The EVO has obstacle avoidance sensors on the front and in the back. In the font, you get two obstacle avoidance cameras (same as the Mavic). On the back, you’ll find not cameras, but a IR sensor for obstacle avoidance. IR sensors or good for close obstacle detection, but they don’t work for seeing obstacles that are more complex or far away. The Mavic Air and Mavic 2 use cameras on the rear, so they will naturally do better at avoiding obstacles at higher speeds. In any case, if you need obstacle avoidance on your drone, the EVO has it.
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