Almost every piece of electronics has been modified from the Vortex 250 Pro and big improvements have been made—starting with the flight controller. It’s an all new design called Synergy, with duel F3 processors for faster 8KHz update rates. Because of this, it also comes with Bataflight firmware pre installed instead of Cleanflight. If you didn’t understand any of that, just know that this drone will fly super locked-in.

It is a bare-bones quadcopter that relies entirely on the skills of the pilot handling the remote. Controls are easy to use. It comes in a minimalistic design with a plastic frame and electronics placed in a small cavity at the center. It has a small battery-powered at 500 mAh. The camera is small and is connected by wires. It also has a micro-USB card for storing videos and images. The rotors are small at 5.25 cm diameter and made of plastic with a small screw locking it in place. You also get a spare set of rotors along with a small screwdriver. Buttons on the quadcopter can take photos, start and stop videos, flip and change the flight mode, etc.
The DJI Phantom series drones are some of the most capable and recognizable drones on the market. The Phantom 1 was a revolutionary aircraft that put DJI and prosumer drones on the map. The Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 has collectively built on the series success and continues to be used for photography, filmmaking, inspections, and various other applications.
There’s a few different versions of the Hubsan X4. The cheapest version doesn’t have an agility mode like the Nano QX so you can’t fly with complete manual control, but it’s pretty fast and maneuverable (even with auto leveling). It also has 6 LED lights which can be turned on and off from the controller. Speaking of controllers, the controller that comes with the 3 cheaper Hubsan models is actually pretty nice. I like it better than what comes with the Nano QX and the Proto x).
So, you’ve decided to buy one of the many drones for sale. Maybe you want to get in on the future of aerial photography. Maybe you’re looking for a fun and futuristic toy for your kids. Or maybe you just want to see what all the fuss is about. No matter the reason, unmanned aerial vehicles make great tools and toys, and there’s never been a better time to get one for yourself.
The biggest competitor for the Bebop 2 is the DJI Spark. Although you can’t use hand gestures to control the Bebop 2 and there’s no obstacle avoidance, you do get features like follow me and visual subject tracking. For $599, it also comes with the controller, two batteries, and goggles that work with most smartphones. If you really want to shoot good videos, the Spark might be a better option because of the 2 axis gimbal, but the digital stabilization of the Bebop 2 is almost just as good.
So, you’ve decided to buy one of the many drones for sale. Maybe you want to get in on the future of aerial photography. Maybe you’re looking for a fun and futuristic toy for your kids. Or maybe you just want to see what all the fuss is about. No matter the reason, unmanned aerial vehicles make great tools and toys, and there’s never been a better time to get one for yourself.
Drones are fun. For many, that's reason enough to get one. Others find the lure of owning the latest technology irresistible. But when you factor in the photography and video possibilities, there are many other potential benefits to owning one. First, a drone camera can enhance the way you do business. If you're a realtor, a photography drone offers you a noteworthy way to showcase your properties with an overhead view. If you farm, you might use a drone to help you monitor your property and operations, and to get useful data on your crops. If you're a photographer, a small drone with camera could give you the edge you need to beat out your competition for wedding or event photography jobs. Beyond business considerations, a mini drone with camera can help your posts stand out on social media.
Propel's X-Wing fighter drone is a great drone for Star Wars fans. There are actually three drones in this line: the X-Wing, a Tie X1, and a Speeder Bike. The best part is all of them have a "battle mode" so you can fly against friends and try to shoot them down. Get hit three times with the IR beam and your drone will auto-land. Unfortunately, these have a learning curve when it comes to flying—a little tap of the control stick goes a long way—and mine had a habit of flying off at an angle immediately on takeoff. Holding a position is also a lost cause, but once you master the sensitive controls, these are fun to fly (and fight).
If you do like to play with color, there’s a setting for that too. Using Dlog-M (a color profile for video) you can shoot a flatter video to retain more detail in the shadows and highlights. Once you have the footage in your editor, you can then stretch the colors out and make the shot look exactly the way you want with lots of dynamic range and lifelike colors.

And now the bad news. You get what you pay for, and if you want an aerial video platform that can capture stunning footage, you need to be ready to spend some cash. Because drones are such pricey propositions, it pays to do your research before buying one. We've tested many of the ready-to-fly models on the market to determine what's important to look for, and the best models available.
If you look at drones like the Falcore from Connex and the Vortex 150 from ImmersionRC, although both can be great beginner drones, they aren’t really in a low enough price range for a lot of people who are just getting started. Yes, you’re getting what you pay for, but sometimes you don’t have that much to spend and you still want something reasonable. That’s where the Vision 250 comes in.

If you want the coolest drone on the planet right now, or you need a drone that can film you riding your bike down a mountain, or doing parkour in the forest, this is the drone to get. For the rest of us, one of the DJI Mavic models is a much more practical option. I do think that what Skydio is doing is very impressive though. When it comes to autonomous drones, I think Skydio is at least a year or two ahead of DJI.
If you’ve seen the Mavic 2 Zoom and Mavic 2 Pro, you know they shoot 4K video at 30FPS. The EVO Goes one step further shooting 4K video at 60FPS. This is a great feature if you like capturing sports and action shots and slowing down the action. If it seems strange that a small company could come out with a drone that has a faster camera than DJI, that’s because it is. Personally, I think that DJI limited the framerate on the Mavic 2 so it didn’t fully cannibalize the Phantom 4 Pro, but nobody knows for sure.

Most of the time, you will buy drones from Amazon.com or directly from the site of the drone manufacturer. Physical drone storefronts are less common, although they do exist. We have provided Amazon links for all of our drones, and since we’re affiliate partners with the site, we get a little bit of money if you use them. So if you like our writing and this guide has been helpful to you, please consider buying a drone using the links we provide!


Now that you know what to look for in low cost drones, let’s get right to the list. If you’re in a hurry or looking for the best of the best, check out our top and budget picks. They’re what we consider to be amazing drones that are incredibly high quality without the high price tag. If you want to be sure you’re getting the best drone for you, be sure to read through our other eight picks. They’re all amazing choices for anyone looking for a great drone with a camera. Happy flying!
All Mambos have a special mount on them that you can use to add on additional accessories. The newest accessory is the FPV camera. When combined with the included FPV goggles, the Mambo FPV allows you to fly the drone in a completely new way from other toy drones. You get to see what the drone sees and fly around as if you were inside the cockpit of the drone.

A unique feature with the EVO II is the ability to change out the gimbal payload. It can be equipped with an 8K sensor, 6K Pro Sensor, or a Dual sensor that combines an 8K sensor with a thermal sensor. The ability to alternate sensors is unheard of in the consumer/prosumer drone market. With 12 advanced omnidirectional computer vision sensors, the drone can easily navigate the most challenging environments while focusing on the task.
The Altair 818 Plus has a lot of the features that made the AA108 our top choice, but it also adds a little something extra – it can get 15 minutes of flight time off of a single battery charge. That’s almost unheard of in low-end “toy” drones like this one and it means that the 818 has the longevity to be used for actual photo shoots and videography sessions. It also has a much longer range of 150 meters, which makes it perfect for finding those hard-to-reach perfect shots.
Our top pick is the best budget camera drone around and is sure to wow with a 720p HD camera and 6 axis gyro technology. It comes with headless security, which makes it easy for beginners to learn without destroying their drone. It also has one key return, which allows you to easily and quickly call the drone home when you’re finished flying. It even comes with an altitude hold function, which can be incredibly useful for getting a great view of one particular spot. As one of the best low cost drones with camera, the Holy Stone F181C Quadcopter Drone is an easy top pick. It comes with two batteries so you can keep flying for longer. This drone flips four ways, so it’s great at doing tricks once you get the hang of flying it. It is easy to safely land, with one key engine start and stop. This is a great pick for pros and beginners who are looking for a fun drone that won’t break the bank.
I can’t cover everything about the Inspire 2 on this page, but one thing that I need to mention is that this is not something you should buy for your 12-year-old son as a gift. The Inspire 2 costs roughly $6,000 and is intended mainly for people who want the absolute best aerial photography/cinematography tool on the market; however, the Inspire 2 is still one of the easiest drones to fly, so don’t feel intimidated. Whether you have a real use for this drone, or you just want something that will impress all of your friends, the Inspire 2 is definitely a drone worth looking into.
If you like the design of the Inspire 2, but just can’t afford it, you might also consider buying the Inspire 1. It’s obviously nowhere near as good as the Inspire 2 if you compare the features, but the video quality you can get from the older X5 camera is still in a lot of cases better than the Phantom 4 Pro. DJI also makes hi-zoom and thermal imaging cameras that work with the Inspire 1, in case you need something for agriculture or search-and-rescue use.
The DJI Inspire 2 is aimed at professional cinematographers, news organizations, and independent filmmakers. And it's priced as such—its $3,000 MSRP doesn't include a camera. You have the option of adding a 1-inch sensor fixed-lens camera, a Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens model, or a Super35mm cinema mount with its own proprietary lens system and support for 6K video capture.
Battery life - Battery life is a factor that many drone manufacturers are still trying to nail down. Some drones can only fly for six to eight minutes, while more powerful ones can last up to 30 minutes. If you’re worried about the battery life, look for one with a “return to home” feature, which automatically directs the drone back home when the battery gets too low.

The Anafi is a great drone for the price, but the biggest complaint I have by far is the lack of any sensors for obstacle avoidance. The only obstacle that this drone will stop you from hitting is the ground, that is, as long as you don’t hit a tree first. All of the other drones in this price range have some kind of obstacle avoidance, so why they couldn’t even add some IR sensors is beyond me.
Our expert reviewer and tester evaluate drones on a number of factors. For starters, we examine the size and design, taking into account my many rotors the drone has, how portable it is, and if it comes with an included remote control or camera. Next, take it out to a park or wilderness area and test how easy it is to learn and fly. We pay attention to the learning curve of learning the control, and how much latency there is in video transmission (if the controller has such a feature). We also look at flight capabilities like omnidirectaonal sensing, obstacle avoidance, tracking, and automatic landing.
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