It is light at just about 4.6 ounces and fits well in the hand. It is powered by 4 AA batteries. The quadcopter is fun to fly, as it is small and lightweight and can be easily maneuvered. It can also perform stunts like 360-degree turns, backflips, somersaults, etc. The camera is at the bottom and weighs just 0.2 ounces, coming with a 4GB micro-SD card and a small lens. Videos can be shot at 640 x 480 pixels at 30 fps and still photos at 1280 x 960 pixels, with decent looking colors.
There is a DJI Pilot application for both iOS and Android, enabling total camera control and live viewing. It also has a Beginner Mode for learning to fly. The drone comes including all the tried and trusted features of a DJI drone, with auto-takeoffs and landings, intelligent high-powered flight battery, safety database for no-fly zones and an efficient mobile app. It also locks itself if you use it within a 15-mile radius of the White House, as this is restricted. The dimensions are 18 x 13 x 8 inches and it weighs 9.2 pounds.

The Hubsan H501S packs a lot of features into a much smaller frame than other quadcopters with similar features. To start, it has a 6-axis flight control system,built in GPS and altimeter which keeps this unit very stable in flight. This allows it to have features such as follow-me, return-to-home, and hold-position. It also does quite well in windy conditions. It has four brushless motors complete with gold blades. There’s a spare set in the box too. The fixed 1080P HD camera transmits standard 5.8G wireless video from a distance of about 300 meters. There is an SD slot to record video directly under the camera. The lipo battery is large at 7.4V 2700mAh and has a charging time of approximately 150 minutes. You should have a flight time of about 19 minutes.
Your purchase choices may be driven by politics, but we look more closely at product performance and value. The price of DJI drones recently increased across the board for US customers, a response to increases in import tariffs. As result, competing drones from Autel, Parrot, and Yuneec are more compelling alternatives, as their prices have not yet ticked upward.
The Phantom 4 Pro is an excellent choice for aerial photographers that seek professional results. It features a 1-inch CMOS sensor and shoots 4K 60fps video, making it great for filmmaking and photography. It also features DJI’s FlightAutonomy system, providing you with five directions of obstacle sensing. This can come in handy when flying in tight spaces, which is sometimes required for filming and photography. If this feature isn’t hugely important to you, you can save some money and get a Phantom 4 Advanced, which comes with two directions of obstacle sensing. While this drone model is no longer in production, you can pick up a refurbished one! 

The transmission range is 4.3 miles for 30 minutes and it offers a true 4K stabilized and smooth footage. Buttons are simple to access and users can command the drone to return home, including automatic take-off and landing, capturing photos, videos, etc. It can autonomously follow objects, thereby creating a box shape around the object. Cinematic shots are easy, where you just select the point that is to be shot and the drone flies a perfect circle around it. Automatic flight routes can also be set for surveying.
Value-added services are crucial factors when deciding which drone manufacturer to go with. Besides the standard warrantee, buying your camera drone from a company that offers in-depth tutorials, personal training, workshops, and so on is a smart decision. What’s more, there is also accidental insurance coverage. For novice pilots, these services are always a big plus.
There are a few downsides to this drone, the main one being the price. At $1,999 USD, not everyone will be able to afford it. It also uses a 2 axis gimbal, so panning motion is not very smooth. Since it doesn’t have a controller, that also means you can’t fly the drone farther than wifi range will allow. The biggest issue with this drone in my opinion is the size It’s not much larger than the Mavic 2 when unfolded, but that’s the problem, it doesn’t fold up at all. This means if you want to fit it into a camera bag or small backpack, you’re just out of luck.
The Falcore has a lot of cool technology inside of it, but this drone isn’t heavy on pro racing features. There is an OSD, but you can’t adjust any settings on the flight controller from the OSD like you can on the Vortex 180 and it runs Cleanflight which isn’t as good as Bataflight. Another thing that you might not think about is range. The video transmitter and receiver have a range of 1000 feet to 3000 feet depending on the environment you’re in. Although this is fine for most park flights, there are races that might require a more reliable signal at those farther distances, and with a traditional analog FPV setup it’s easy to get more range with better antennas.
The Vortex 285 is another drone from ImmersionRC. It’s actually one of the first ready-to-fly FPV racing drones that came to market back in 2015, but because of the features it has and the price, it’s still very relevant even today. It runs similar firmware to the Vortex 250 Pro, but the hardware is just slightly slower which means that it shouldn’t be as responsive.

It is a compact camera drone with a foldable design. It has a flight time of 30 minutes. The camera is a 12 MP one capable of capturing stunning 4K videos at 60 fps. It is built on a gimbal platform with 3-axis stabilizers providing greater stability and has a 94-degree FoV. It has both GPS and GLONASS, including 2 cameras in the front, with the help of which it can create a 3D map of the surroundings and move through it securely and efficiently. Users can see and control the activity from a 3.3 inches OLED screen built in it.
People like camera drones that capture great videos, so instead of giving the Mavic Air a watered down Mavic Pro camera, DJI went all out. They gave the Mavic Air 4K video recording with a bit rate of 100mbps. This means your videos will have less compression than they would if you were using the original Mavic Pro. At first glance, you might think that the gimbal came strait from the Spark, but this isn’t the case. It’s an all new design with ND filter support and 3 axis stabilization. All of this boils down to one thing; more cinematic videos!
Even if you have no good reason to justify buying one, you have to admit that drones are cool. Some are glorified tech toys, but most models we highlight here are fit for use in imaging and cinematic applications small and large. If you think you can use a flying camera in your next project, there's some good news—the tech has come a long way in a very short time. There are models on the market now that put earlier copters to shame in terms of video quality and stabilization.
There are a few downsides to this drone, the main one being the price. At $1,999 USD, not everyone will be able to afford it. It also uses a 2 axis gimbal, so panning motion is not very smooth. Since it doesn’t have a controller, that also means you can’t fly the drone farther than wifi range will allow. The biggest issue with this drone in my opinion is the size It’s not much larger than the Mavic 2 when unfolded, but that’s the problem, it doesn’t fold up at all. This means if you want to fit it into a camera bag or small backpack, you’re just out of luck.
The Dolly Zoom enables capturing both wide-angle and mid-range shots. It includes a 3-axis gimbal for providing stable footage whatever the situation may be. The total flight time is 31 minutes, which is the longest for consumer drones today. It has a maximum speed of 72 kmph in Sport mode and also includes a low-noise technology during flight. Other features include an Active Track 2.0 and high-speed tracking abilities for speeds up to 27 kmph. Aerial shots are taken and processed automatically with the Hyperlapse feature. Another useful feature is obstacle avoidance sensors that sense obstacles around the object. It is capable of planning its path on a 3D map and can recognize and move away from obstacles in the front or from behind.
Portability is the new trend of the camera drone market. Most of the time, it is inconvenient and tough to carry a large, heavy camera drone around. This is particularly the case for those of you who want to shoot when traveling. By that rationale, mini drones make it infinitely easier for you to shoot on the go, no matter if hiking or attending a family barbecue.

Drones aren't just flying cameras, though; they're also the modern version of remote-controlled vehicles. And again, they've made flying easier and more accessible, thanks to intelligent collision sensors that protect your investment from mishaps. There are a dizzying array of drones available, but there is a basic division to be aware of—cheaper drones, while fun, will never fly as well or deliver the kind of video and photo results possible with more expensive models. With drones, you get what you pay for. That said, if you're not worried about wowing YouTube with your sweeping panoramic masterpiece, you don't have to spend a fortune to get a good, fun drone. Here are the best drones I've tested for every budget.


The Parrot Anafi drone has anrf/2.4 wide-angled ASPH HDR lens with a digital zoom of 2.8x capable of 4K videos FHD or 2.7K videos at 2704 x 1520 pixels with 21MP photos, and a 180-degree tilt gimbal. In addition, it has a timer, Burst mode for 10 photos per second as well as wizards for professional settings. The design is an ultra-portable one weighing just 11.2 oz, being both robust and easily foldable. It comes in a case that protects the quadcopter during transportation. The dimensions are 9.4 x 6.9 x 2.6 inches and it weighs 1.56 pounds.
The TBS Vendetta is a quadcopter designed specifically for FPV (first person view) racing and freestyle flying. Today, you can find quite a few mini FPV racing drones that come ready to fly, but the Vendetta was one of the first racing drones to come out with everything you need to fly. It comes with almost everything you need to start learning to race. The only things that it won’t come with is a controller, battery, charger and FPV video goggles, but in the world of drone racing you’ll usually want to choose that stuff to fit your needs anyway.
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