If you’re looking for the perfect drone to take your creativity to the next level, or if you work in videography, look no further than the DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2.0. The advanced camera features, including 20 megapixels, 4K video, and an accurate mechanical shutter put it on par with many traditional cameras. It delivers stunning video and images that any photographer would be proud of.
Though you’ll occasionally find good drones for less than $100, most drones for sale tend to be fairly expensive. It all depends on the brand and model that you are buying, as well as the features, specifications, etc that are involved. For example, for a more high-tech, newer drone that incorporates more than ten features, you’re going to be looking at a price that’s closer to $1000 more often than not.

Though you’ll occasionally find good drones for less than $100, most drones for sale tend to be fairly expensive. It all depends on the brand and model that you are buying, as well as the features, specifications, etc that are involved. For example, for a more high-tech, newer drone that incorporates more than ten features, you’re going to be looking at a price that’s closer to $1000 more often than not.


Removable cameras: In some models, users can remove the cameras and fly the drone without the camera attached, excellent if this is a gift for a beginner who still needs to learn to fly. This helps to reduce the weight of the drone, thus enabling longer flights. More importantly, this feature enables camera upgrades when there are advances in the technology. Perhaps your gift to mom or dad next year will be just such an upgrade.

There are many different kinds of drones available today. The typical cost for a toy drone ranges from about $20 to $250. Camera Drones start at around $300 and go up from there. The DJI Mavic Pro (the best drone we’ve tested) retails for just under $1,000. Professional drone users will spend tens of thousands of dollars to get the best image quality and flight time.


We at Dronethusiast have been giving the best reviews and drone advice for years and were actually one of the first online drone blogs. We have the necessary experience with drones and drone accessories and are confident in the reviews that we create for our readers. We only review and recommend the best flying drones for sale to our readers, and that is why you can put your trust in us. And if you’re in the market for a new RC Car make sure to check our article on the Best RC Car Reviews!
There are many different kinds of drones available today. The typical cost for a toy drone ranges from about $20 to $250. Camera Drones start at around $300 and go up from there. The DJI Mavic Pro (the best drone we’ve tested) retails for just under $1,000. Professional drone users will spend tens of thousands of dollars to get the best image quality and flight time.
There are actually two relatively new Vortex drones; the Vortex 150 and the even newer Vortex 180. The only difference between the two is the arm length, motor size, and prop size. The Vortex 150 uses custom 1306-3100kV motors and 3 inch propellers. The Vortex 180 uses custom XNova 1407-3500kV motors and 4 inch propellers. If you like smaller quads, the Vortex 150 might interest you, but if you want to race and like having a lot of power then you’ll want to go with the bigger motors and props on the Vortex 180.
Headless mode took me some time to figure out, but once I did it worked like a charm! Very stable flyer. Very durable. I have crashed this a few times doing some extreme flying (trying to fly through obstacles like picnic tables, playground etc) It took some nasty beatings and still flies excellent. The prop guards are a thicker gauge and will def. protect the quad, however, I like to fly with them off to kill some weight and the quad performs a little more aggressively too. The camera is removable also if you want to shave more weight. Even with the prop guards off it's still strong (most of my crashes were without the prop guards) over all 100% recommended and if the video helps please leave a thumbs up.

There are two versions of this drone. Tello is the standard version and Tello EDU is the version with all of the programming features. Tello EDU also has image recognition for identifying the Tello Mission Pads. These special pads allow you to program Tello to do something when it sees each unique pad, or use it as a tracking marker for more precise flying and navigation.
It does include a camera, although not the greatest quality but still fun to play around with. This drone, like many others also has a headless feature, but also features an altitude hold function or hover which is something most of the less expensive drones do not have. This is especially useful when trying to learn how to hover. FPV is not possible with the small LCD display on the controller but it does give you some vital information about the drone during flight.
The Anafi is a great drone for the price, but the biggest complaint I have by far is the lack of any sensors for obstacle avoidance. The only obstacle that this drone will stop you from hitting is the ground, that is, as long as you don’t hit a tree first. All of the other drones in this price range have some kind of obstacle avoidance, so why they couldn’t even add some IR sensors is beyond me.
If image quality is your priority, then you might opt for the Mavic 2 Pro over the Zoom. The 2 Pro is equipped with a 1” CMOS, 20-megapixel camera co-engineered in partnership with Hasselblad, the world’s leading manufacturer of medium format cameras and lenses. The Zoom’s camera system is still professional-grade however, with a 1/2.3” CMOS, 12-megapixel sensor.
×